29th November 2020 – First Sunday of Advent

29th November. The Week Ahead:-

Sunday                No public Mass

Monday              No public Mass

Tuesday              No public Mass

Wednesday        Mass 10am in Clitheroe

Thursday             Mass 10am in Clitheroe

Friday                  Mass 10am in Clitheroe

Saturday            Mass 12 noon in Dunsop Bridge

Mass 5pm in Clitheroe

Sunday                Mass 9.30am in Clitheroe

Mass 11am in Sabden

As from next Wednesday Public Mass will again be celebrated following the previous restrictions which were in force before the last lockdown.

There is still no Sunday Obligation, numbers are limited in Church, masks must be worn, and Masses will be brief with no singing and Holy Communion will be distributed on the way out of Church.

Advent:-

As you know, this year the Season of Advent will be different. To help parishioners to build Church at Home, the Department for Formation have created a document of resources called Preparing the Way: Advent at Home.
You can access the document via the website: https://www.dioceseofsalford.org.uk/news/covid19/advent-at-home/
They will be sharing weekly reflections, videos and resources on our website, social media and via the Wednesday bulletin in the coming weeks.

The Word This Week

Advent opens with a great cry, and a great promise: Oh that you would tear the heavens open and come down! is the cry, of a people who need God…The master is coming is the promise, not to breed fear, but to answer our cry. Advent begins, not with thoughts of the past, with the coming of the Lord we celebrate at Christmas, but with the future, and the promise that He is coming back. We are encouraged to treat every day as the day the Lord will come; we do not do this out of fear for a Master who beats his servants, but out of love of a Master who always treats us with love and mercy. Nevertheless we must always be watchful, because we can grow sleepy and complacent, saying that we can leave this prayer or that confession or the other change in the way we live to tomorrow. Even as we look forward to the tomorrow of the Lord’s coming, we must remember that it might be today!


Lately Dead:Kathleen Lakin, Joanna Berry, Carmelius Sheehy, Joan Chew

PARISH FORUM

     The next Parish Forum will be held “virtually” on 30th November with a 7.00 p.m. start for a general “catch up” and the meeting starting at 7.30 p.m.  Please send any agenda items to me on anhark456@aol.com and I will pass them to our Chair, Carol Riley.

It is simple to join the meeting and you do not need an invitation. If you have installed the Zoom App on your computer, tablet or smartphone (recommended) the ID is 865 074 9717.  If you don’t have the App installed, click on the link https://us02web.zoom.us/j/8650749717

The last meeting was really great way to catch up with other parishioners who you may not have “seen” since this all started in March.  Even if you don’t normally attend, please consider doing so.  This is definitely a case of, “the more, the merrier” and it’s not likely that you will have other plans!

LAUDATO SI’ ZOOM MEETING, TUESDAY 1 DECEMBER, 2.00 PM

Our parish Laudato Si’ (Live Simply) Group hasn’t met since January but during that time we have liaised with the local primary schools and we hope that we can bring the Parish and the schools more closely together, not just on the environmental issues but on all things pertaining to social justice and integrally bound with our faith.

We are pleased to have input from St Michael and St John’s Primary School and also from Bob Turner who led the eco developments at St Mary’s Primary School, Clayton-le-Moors.

Please attend if you can.

You will find details and instructions on our Laudato Si’ (Live Simply) Group  webpage 

Clitheroe Civic Society:

The next Civic Society Meeting via ‘Zoom’ will be on Monday 7th December when Andy Froud, Vicar at St Mary Magdalene Clitheroe, is giving a presentation entitled “The Real Father Christmas”.

The meeting will commence at 7.30pm. Non-members of the Society are most welcome to join us. There is a cover charge of £3.00 for visitors to be paid prior to the commencement of our virtual meetings. Details of access is available via our Treasurer Barbara Alty by email at: shawcottage3@btinternet.com.


FROM THE ARCHIVES:

An extract from The Boy’s School Log Book January 1870

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     I, John Burke took charge of this school this day January 10th 1870.  The attendance in the morning was 52 and that in the afternoon was 47.

The Rev’nd Manager, Father Cardwell, visited the school this morning.

I found it almost impossible to teach single-handed, the ‘3 Rs’ to the different standards.  I used a monitor from the 6th Standard to superintend the transcription of the 2nd and 3rd Standards, but found him utterly useless.  I find that I must deal very strictly with the children who are having silent work in the desks, for any breach of the school rules while I am giving special lessons.

There is only one easel and one blackboard in the school.  Another easel and blackboard is indispensable to the good instruction.

I warned the half-timers of coming late and also of the negligent manner in which their home tasks were done.  I also put the home tasks down on the partition between the two schools.  I think that if parts of the partition were painted they would make good blackboards.  The home tasks were put down in the morning so that the half timers who came in the morning might take them home.

The night scholars are few in number.  They are very industrious.

The writing in the school receives a great check from the children buying what copy books they think fit in the town shops.  I must endeavour to get a series of copy books in the school and compel the children to buy that copy gook which I think best suited for them.  The attendance this afternoon was very poor.  Many of the children leave the school at 11.30 in the morning and 3.30 in the afternoon on the plea of home duties.  I must see into the truth of this.  I punished publicly several boys for coming late, they being previously named.   This afternoon I told all the children that no boy should leave the school during the school hours, to go home, unless received word from their parents that they had to go.  Many of the children looked very blank at this.  I fear that many of them have been going home this week during the school hours unnecessarily.

The time table does not work as well as I could wish.  I must alter it by Monday next.

I told all those who are in copy books that before buying a copy book they must first of all ask what number they are to buy.

I examined the dictation of Standard VI and found that out of ten lines of Stand VI reading book, some of the Standard VI boys had as many as eight mistakes in spelling.

 

Two parents came today stating that their children must leave the school at 11.15 am and gave the parents to understand that their children must be in the school at least two hours before that time.

I punished publicly two boys who ran out of the school before four O’clock on Tuesday afternoon.

The children were very restless all day, and the attendance was small.  One of the children’s mothers came today and threatened to send her boy to a protestant school if he did not make more progress.  The child to my own knowledge is getting on very well which I told her. I also told her that if she sent her boy to a protestant school she alone would be held accountable for her child’s soul.

Several boys asked me today what copy books they should buy.  I acquainted the Rev’nd Manager of the necessity of a payed monitor in the school.

The attendance was fair.  The children were very talkative today about their Sunday School prizes which they received yesterday.

The home tasks today were done very badly.  I fear I have been too lenient in hearing them.

Punished two boys for truant

The Rev’nd Manager F.Cardwell has kindly allowed me a payed monitor.  He began his duties this morning.

The monitor was absent this afternoon without leave.  I have devoted an half hour every day during the whole of this week to give a special writing lesson to the whole school at once, in order to eradicate the errors which the children make in joining letters to the letters ‘w’ and ‘v’ and ‘b’.  The result of the lesson has been very satisfactory.

 

From 1947 – CLITHEROE ADVERTISER AND TIMES

CLITHEROE CATHOLIC GIRLS CLUB

ASPIDISTRA WENT TOO

     The drama section of Clitheroe Catholic Girls Club with two ‘busloads’ of supporters, most of the furniture from Stanley House, and numerous bags and boxes filled with “props” including an aspidistra which is not the biggest in the world, was the biggest seen in these parts for some time, travelled to the Jubilee Theatre, Blackpool recently to give their festival-winning play at the County display.

Four other plays were presented by teams from Cleveleys, St Helens and Blackpool.  Clitheroe’s was the only comedy, and judging by the laughter and applause the audience found it rather a relief after the tragedy and drama of the rest of the evening.

VALUABLE EXPERIENCE

     There was no detailed adjudication, but after the final curtain Mr A Willett Whittaker, Lancashire Drama Organiser, spoke of his pleasure at the standard the teams had attained and of the importance and benefit of drama as a club activity.  Mrs Walter Elliot, chairman of the National Association of Girls’ and Mixed Clubs, was also present and expressed her enjoyment of the entertainment.

The players were a little disappointed not to have the benefit of an adjudicator’s criticism and comments, but nevertheless, found it a valuable experience to perform in a display and to have the opportunity of comparing the work of other teams.

FRANTIC SEARCH

     Before the performance, some of the Clitheronians spent a rather envious five minutes prowling about the back-stage, most of them wishing it were possible to take home the magnificent set of curtains which the Jubilee Theatre possesses.  Needless to say the evening was not without its lighter side.  A necessary sofa for the set nearly didn’t turn up, and at the last minute a frantic search had to be made for a piece of furniture on which to stand the precious aspidistra.  About 20 of the party got stuck in the lift taking them to the theatre and had to be rescued; several people managed to get lost in fish and chip shops just before the return home.

COMB BAND

          Finally after a number of hectic and practically useless attempts to count furniture, props and people from forgetting the aspidistra, the party set off homewards and arrived in Clitheroe with a comb band and two impromptu choirs in full swing shortly after midnight.

Audrey Bradshaw, the producer, tells me she hopes the next production will be a three-act “something” that isn’t comedy.

15th November 2020 – 33rd Sunday in Ordinary Time

Covid-19 Guidance – November 2020

On 4 November 2020, Parliament passed into law The Health Protection (Coronavirus, Restrictions) (England) (No. 4) Regulations 2020. These are in force from 5 November to 2 December 2020. As well as the Regulations, the Government has updated its Guidance for the safe use of places of worship to reflect current circumstances. The Regulations preclude gatherings for communal worship, including the celebration of Mass, baptisms and most weddings.

Funerals can take place following present guidelines and restrictions.

So in accordance with the above there will be no public celebration of Mass or any other form of Public Worship in any of our churches at present. Fr. Paul will continue to celebrate Mass each day in one of our three churches, without a congregation and behind locked doors.


You may be aware that earlier this week, the Independent Inquiry into Child Sexual Abuse (IICSA) published its report into the Catholic Church.
In its response, the Bishops’ Conference of England and Wales said: “We apologise to all victims and survivors who have not been properly listened to, or properly supported by us. By listening with humility to those who have suffered, we can contribute to the healing of the wounds of abuse, as well as learn from those most directly affected how we must improve the Church’s safeguarding standards, policies and procedures.”

We know that with the report comes an increased awareness of abuse, which may lead individuals to reflect on their own experiences. If you are aware of people in distress, the support on offer via our Healing Through Community project can be accessed by anyone living within the Diocese of Salford.

If you would like to access help, please call Survivors Manchester on 0161 236 2182 or Greater Manchester Rape Crisis on 0161 273 4500. The Safeguarding Office is also available for any safeguarding queries or referrals by all. Their number is 0161 817 2206.

Let us all join in prayer for the healing of those that have been hurt and abused by members of the Church.
You can read the full Bishops’ Conference response here: https://www.cbcew.org.uk/statement-on-the-publication-of-the-iicsa-report/

The Word This Week

We must be very careful that the real point of today’s first reading is not washed away in genuine concerns over what one can and cannot say about the responsibilities of spouses. This is not, in fact, a recipe for the perfect wife, but an illustration, from one age, of the virtue of fully employing the talents God gives us. Some things are timeless, such as holding out a hand to the poor, while other talents shift and change. The point is that all of us are gifted in varying ways and degrees: none of us should begrudge anyone else their talents, for fear that we overlook our own. We work wisely and well, looking forward to the master’s return, when we can hand over to him not just what he gave us, but also the fruits that our labours have gained.

Parish Forum

The next Parish Forum will be held “virtually” on Monday 30th November with 7pm start for a general “catch up” and the meeting starting at 7.30pm.  Please send any agenda items to me on anhark456@aol.com and I will pass them to our Chair, Carol Riley.

It is simple to join the meeting and you do not need an invitation.  If you have installed the Zoom App (recommended) on your computer, tablet or smartphone the ID is 865 074 9717.  If you don’t have the App installed, click on the link https://us02web.zoom.us/j/8650749717.

The last meeting was really a great way to catch up with other parishioners who you may not have “seen” since this all started in March.  Even if you don’t normally attend, please consider doing so.  This is definitely a case of, “the more, the merrier” and it’s not likely that you will have other plans!

CLITHEROE CHURCHES IN PARTNERSHIP
RIBBLE VALLEY YOUTH

Many of you will be aware of plans for a town-wide youth strategy. Part of this strategy is the launch of a new platform called “Ribble Valley Youth”, or “RVY” for short. Our intention is that RVY should be a town-wide ministry for young people in the Ribble Valley. The goals are to reach our young people with the Gospel, to build a community of young believers and help disciple them.
Part of our plan includes providing an online presence via social media and other platforms. We have now launched RVY channels and accounts on most Social Media platforms, including Facebook & Youtube.
We are very excited to be launching RVY with a Youtube live stream on Friday 20th November at 7pm. Can we ask you to encourage your young people to join us in the live stream? Youth volunteers are also very welcome.
We hope this town-wide youth strategy will be something every church can be part of and shape together.
See the link to the Youtube Channel, and the launch trailer below.

Every blessing,   Chris Meyer, and the RVY Team.

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCizk5dkOLhMGAYiF2c60DQA/featured

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FROM THE ARCHIVES

DECEMBER 1899 – ST MICHAEL AND JOHN

GRAND SOIREE

     To swell the funds at the forthcoming Sale of Work which is ere long to be held, in connection with the above schools, a grand soiree was held in the Public Hall on Friday evening last.  The event was exceedingly well patronised, there being over 200 present during the evening.  The Hall itself presented a pleasing and artistic appearance, the windows being exquisitely draped, there also being seats placed in different parts of the room for the convenience and indulgence of those present.  This being the case, one could, as it were, make himself “at home,” and when not inclined to trip along to the music which was supplied by Mr Gudgeon’s band – and also everyone knows the type of dances these gentlemen can supply – he could betake himself to some small group and there join in with some pleasant conversation; perhaps it would not be altogether pleasant to speck of the meteoric shower bringing the end of the world as pleasant conversation.  Albeit it, this subject would at some length be debated upon.  However, this by the way, this just shows that one could enjoy himself and that right heartily.  The members of the Catholic Ball Committee, of which Mr R.Holden is at the head, were responsible for the decorations.

During the evening, a duet was given by Messrs. J.Duckett and H.Holden, songs also being rendered by Mr J.Holden and the Misses P.Parker, M.Cornwall, and J.Balshaw, the latter receiving an encore.

The evening was in this wise spent in a convivial manner, dancing, which commenced at 8 o’clock, being held up until the small hours of the morning.

Needless is it for us to say the Sale will have received some pecuniary assistance.


INFANT SCHOOL LOG   June 24th 1878 Inspection Report

The Infants School may perhaps be said to be in a fair state of efficiency but I cannot express myself altogether satisfied with it.  Too many children are in the lower classes who from their age and from the time they have been in the school ought to be in the upper, and the work done in each class falls below what is usually done in Infant Schools both in extent and thoroughness.  This is the case with the rudiments of Reading, Writing and Number, and with the subjects taught by gallery lessons also.  Writing is the most satisfactory subject of instruction.  Discipline is fair but maintained with an excess of effort.  I shall expect better results next year.

B.Joyce                                        Spelling and Geography

Pupil Teacher                             Bedelia Joyce 5th Year

Mistress                                      Jane Agnes Baynes

Manager & Correspondent     William Lea

The school closed for a months holiday to re-open on July 29th

 

INFANT SCHOOL LOG   –  1879 Inspection Report

Under the new Mistress the Infants School appears to be advancing in efficiency.  Its general tone is more satisfactory, and though the instruction is not yet more than fair, it gives promise of improvement.  Sewing is properly taught.  Discipline has improved.

Catherine Chew          Mistress

Mary Bramley             Candidate for Admission

William Lea                 Manager & Correspondent

———————————————————————————————
INFANT SCHOOL LOG   –  1880 Inspection Report

Received the Inspectors report of the school which is as follows: The Infants School has progressed both in instruction and discipline.  It is now in a very fair state of efficiency, and appears likely to make still further advances.  The children of six are well, the younger ones fairly taught the rudiments of Reading, Writing and Number.  The Gallery lessons are satisfactorily given.  Sewing, Singing and Repitition are very fair.

Mary Bramley         Geography

Catherine Chew      Mistress

Mary Bramley         1st Year

William Lea             Manager & Correspondent

8th November 2020 – 32nd Sunday in Ordinary Time

Covid-19 Guidance – November 2020

On 4 November 2020, Parliament passed into law The Health Protection (Coronavirus, Restrictions) (England) (No. 4) Regulations 2020. These are in force from 5 November to 2 December 2020. As well as the Regulations, the Government has updated its Guidance for the safe use of places of worship to reflect current circumstances. The Regulations preclude gatherings for communal worship, including the celebration of Mass, baptisms and most weddings.
Funerals can take place following present guidelines and restrictions.
So in accordance with the above there will be no public celebration of Mass or any other form of Public Worship in any of our churches at present.
Fr. Paul will continue to celebrate Mass each day in one of our three churches, without a congregation and behind locked doors, as required.

Remembrance Sunday:-

Today is Remembrance Sunday— the day when we always offer special prayers for all the victims of war, as we also celebrate our remembrance of those whose generous sacrifices have ensured the freedom, safety and survival of so many others. Since we are not able to gather as we usually would, let’s make a special effort to offer a prayer at home, and remember the two minute silence at 11.00 a.m. on Sunday and next Wednesday.

THE WORD THIS WEEK:-

“Watch early for wisdom”: wise words, and ones that the foolish bridesmaids of the Gospel should have taken to heart! This is the ultimate in ’putting off till tomorrow…’, since the reading is about the end of time, when the Son of Man will come again. Then there will be no tomorrow. If a thing is worth doing, it’s worth doing today. Quite often we contemplate the end of time with anxiety and fear: this is not what God wants. Look at the Psalm, where we hear of desperate longing, a thirst for the Lord, that cannot wait. We should not just wait for the Lord with patient endurance, but with impatient longing: what could we desire more than the coming of the Lord, the rising of the dead and an eternity of joy and glory?


FROM THE ARCHIVES
An extract from the Girls School Log Book – 1875
October 15th Louisa Higginson resigns the charge of this School

October 18th School re-opened by Winifride Mary Parkinson a Certificated Mistress of the Second year from the Liverpool Training College. At this date the apparatus consists of 2 sets of Reading Books for each Standard, a good supply of Slates, pens and pencils, 2 Black boards, a Map of Africa, Europe, England, Lancashire and the United States. The attendance has been good considering the season and fair time. Examined Standards III, IV, V, on Reading, Dictation and Arithmetic and found reading pretty good. Dictation bad and Arithmetic fair. There is the Pupil Teacher in her 4th year
Examined Standard I in Reading and Transcribing and found the former subject fair. Arithmetic is poor in Standard II and Multiplication Table unknown. Best exercise books are given to Standards III, IV and V and the children seem pleased, and take great pains in the writing and neatness of their exercises. Two new songs are taught and a holiday given on Thursday and Friday in honour of the fair. Night School attendance pretty good.

October 25th Examined Standards IV, V, and III in Arithmetic and found them backward. Standard I examined in Reading, Writing and Arithmetic
Found Reading good. Writing fair, and Arithmetic pretty good.

November 5th Examination papers given to Standards III, IV and V. A little improvement made during the week. Visit of Rev’d Manager several times during the week and new song taught.

November 12th Rev’d Manager distributes tickets of attendance and good conduct to deserving scholars. Examined Standard I in all subjects and found Dictation poor and the Multiplication table bad.

November 19th Drafted 5 children from Spelling Class into Std I. Examined Standards III and V in Arithmetic result pretty good.

November 26th Lessons satisfactory all week and the attendance very fair considering the weather. Visit of Rev’d Manager on Tuesday. Standards V & IV worked sums in Reduction and are found extremely backward. Standard I examined in Reading, Arithmetic and Tables, result fair in Reading and very fair in Arithmetic but bad in Tables. Three children left school for full time at the Mill, and several taken on half time.

November 30th Visited the school today. Found all in good order.

W.H.Brewer


Extract from a membership card for Clitheroe Catholic Amateur Dramatic Society from 1946:
Clitheroe Catholic Amateur Dramatic Society
Membership Card 1946

MEMBERS NAME…………………..

Subscription for the year 1946, is
Hereby acknowledged as paid

…………………………………

EXTRACTS FROM RULES
The president shall be the Rector for the time being of S.S. Michael & John’s Church, Clitheroe
Membership shall be open to Catholics, whose admittance shall be subject to the approval of the Committee.
The Committee shall consist of not more than eight members, including Chairman, Producer, Business Manager, Secretary-Treasurer, and Stage Manager.
Extracts from Rules (continued)
An Annual General Meeting of the Society shall be held in the month of March.
The Committee shall have power to expel any member shoes conduct is inconsistent with the objects of the Society; but any member having been expelled by the Committee shall have the right of final appeal to the President.
Any dispute arising as to the meaning of any rule shall be decided by the Committee, whose decision shall be final. The Committee shall also have power to make additional rules and to modify existing rules, subject to the approval of the President and that of a General Meeting of Members.

Subscription – 1/- per annum – due January 1st of each year


Clitheroe Advertiser and Times
22nd October 1954
“WORM’S EYE VIEW”
A Three-Act Comedy by
R.F.DELDERFIELD
It’s Far From Quiet On The Home Front
‘LODGERS’ IN UNIFORM TAME A SEASIDE SHREW

St Michael’s Players might be among the newest recruits to the Clitheroe Amateur stage, but they have lost no time in learning Lesson Number One, which is the ability to spot the silk purse from the sow’s ear. So much was clear from their choice of R.F.Delderfield’s phenomenally-successful comedy of wartime days, “Worm’s Eye View,” with which they rang up the curtain on a new season at the Hall, Lowergate on Wednesday.
With a bunch of R.A.F. lads as its reluctant heroes, this particular theatrical purse is blue serge rather than silk, but the contents are no less rewarding for that.
They include a string of riotous situations neatly threaded into a story which relies basically for its appeal on the always irresistible spectacle of the straight-laced being unbuttoned. The formula is a sure-fire laughter-maker, and in this case it is clothed skilfully in the tale of a group of “Erks” billeted on a tyrannical landlady in a Northern seaside town. An evocative brand of Service humour and a portrait gallery of easily-recognisable types decorate the plot entertainingly.

GLORIOUSLY FUNNY

A comparatively youthful cast contrived to make it all gloriously funny, particularly in the last two acts, when early traces of hesitancy were replaced by a firmer grip. As there were few moments when the audience was not laughing, a tendency to talk on top of laughs could be excused if not commended. But otherwise there was a praiseworthy absence of usual first night flaws in a crisp, attractively-mounted production, which got full value from some richly comic material.
One of a number of young actors whose ability augurs well for the future of this new Society, Derek Rawcliffe hit the bullseye as the irrepressible Porter, the Cockney accent in which you could almost hear the Bow Bells, Rawcliffe not only succeeded brilliantly in breaking the accent barrier – a notorious difficulty – but embellished it with a wealth of expressive gesture and comic invention that brought out the full humour of a choice role.

TALENTED HELPERS

As co-partners in undetected crime he had willing and talented helpers in William Taylor, displaying a sure comedy sense as a worldly wise “Duke,” and John Brown, whose capacity to maintain an ingenuous countenance and gallant attempt at a Rhonda accent were bright features of his role as the lugubrious Taffy.
John Cowman as the thoughtful corporal-in-charge, whose romance with the landlady’s daughter precipitates the final crisis, created a thoroughly likeable study, while the R.A.F. quintet, was pleasantly completed by Thomas Cowman, as “Pop,” the veteran of the group. He neatly conveyed the warmth and understanding of the character, but an older make-up might have helped bridge the gap between two world wars more effectively.
Elizabeth Wright, as the landlady, Mrs Bounty, succeeded wholly in suggesting the requisite severity and domineering characteristics of an unsympathetic role, and there was another excellent piece of acting from Derrick Hutchinson as her priggish son, Sydney, a caricature rather than a character, but convincingly portrayed here nonetheless.
A pleasing stage presence helped Margaret Brown create a charming heroine as Bella, the daughter of the house, while Pat Hargreaves shaped an effective little study as Thelma, the maid. Another notable contribution was that of Ignatius Calvert as the henpecked Mr Bounty, a domestic worm that turns magnificently in Mr Calvert’s portrayal during a memorable final scene in which the has of Mrs Bounty and son is well and truly settled. And amid the informality of a “civvy billet,” Peter Fehrenback smartly reminded us of more businesslike but no less human R.A.F. in a brief visit as the men’s C.O.

HIGH MARKS

The play was produced by Mr Norman Cawley, who earns high marks for his deft handling of first-rate comedy scenes, and the production is well served by Donald Kershaw’s excellent setting.
Frank Lofthouse was stage manager, assisted by P.Fullalove and M.Dixon with J.Smith responsible for lighting arrangements. C.Speak, properties, J.Loynd’s, publicity and H.Sutcliffe, house manager.

1st November 2020 – All Saints

The week ahead:-

Sunday Mass  All Saints Day

Dunsop Bridge   12 noon Saturday

Clitheroe              5pm Saturday & 9.30am Sunday

Sabden                 11am Sunday

Weekdays

 10am Monday – Friday in Clitheroe

7pm Wednesday in Sabden

Feasts

Mass on Monday for All Souls Day

Sabden                 9.00am

Clitheroe              10.00am

Dunsop Bridge   12 noon.

Tuesday St Hubert
As it is St. Hubert’s feast day on Tuesday, I will celebrate a Mass at 12 noon in our church in Dunsop Bridge which is of course dedicated to St. Hubert.

Hubertus or Hubert (c. 656 – 30 May 727) was a Christian saint who became the first bishop of Liège in 708 AD. He was the patron saint of hunters, mathematicians, opticians, and metalworkers. Known as the “Apostle of the Ardennes”, he was called upon, until the early 20th century, to cure rabies through the use of the traditional St Hubert’s Key.

All Saints:

This weekend we celebrate the great feast of All Saints, a day for us to look back, look at our present situation, and look to our future.

We celebrate all those who now live with God in heaven. We give thanks for their love and example and we ask for their prayers, and hope that we will be given the grace to one day be united with them in eternity.

We are all called to be saints, and today we pray that all these holy men and women will guide us as we continue to do our best to serve Christ in all things.

All Souls:

Monday 2nd November is the Commemoration of all the Faithful Departed, All Souls Day. There will be a Mass in each of our three churches on Monday to give us the opportunity to come together and remember all the faithful departed that they will receive from Christ gentle mercy, rest for their souls and eternal peace.

Eternal rest grant unto them, O Lord; and let perpetual light shine upon them.

May they rest in peace. Amen.

May their souls and the souls of all the faithful departed, through the mercy of God,

rest in peace. Amen.

LATELY DEAD

Margaret Campbell of Highbrake (previously Railway View Road) aged 93
Eileen Allen aged 83 years

S.V.P.
The SVP would like to thank the parishioner who donated the Smart TV after the appeal we made last weekend.

SVP CHRISTMAS COLLECTION

We have not been able to have a collection since November  2019 and Fr Paul has given us permission to hold one before Christmas. There will be SVP Collection boxes as you leave church after each Mass for two weeks starting on Monday 2nd November. This will also take place at Sabden and Dunsop Bridge so everyone will have an opportunity to make a donation if you wish. We will not distribute Gift Aid envelopes in advance as this will cause complications. Your donation can be cash or cheque into the box or in an envelope. The boxes will be emptied after Mass each day. The money raised will be distributed amongst the local families we help. Please be as generous as you can as Covid 19 is making life difficult for many people.

Thank you all for your help.

Peter Donnelly

FROM THE ARCHIVES

St Michael’s Players

SALAD DAYS

A MUSICAL ENTERTAINMENT

April 13th 1964 for six nights


Producer:  Edmond Cambien

Dancing Mistress: Frances Sherliker

Musical Director: Frank Worden

At the Piano: Rolf Catlow

Bass: William Marshall

Drums: George Burgess

Violins: Freda Taylor   Bernard Lawton

Programme Sixpence

CLITHEROE ADVERTISER AND TIMES APRIL 1964

Bright Musical at The Hall

     St Michael’s Players, who in recent years have presented some very good plays at The Hall, Lowergate, returned to a musical production this week with “Salad Days.”  The choice was an outstanding success, with players befitting their parts so naturally that the show delighted the audiences from start to finish.

The formula for this bright and charming show tells the story of an old piano with a compelling influence that causes everyone to dance to its gay melodies.

This provided an ideal instrument as a vehicle for a youthful display of “twist”, “shake” and other contortions which the effervescent cast performed with astonishing agility.

The simple theme of the play is the triumph of youth over the more security-minded adults, and “Salad Days” does jus this in a charming and sometimes comic manner.

Individual, the honours went to the leading players, Miss Patricia Wareing and Edward Worswick.  Miss Wareing showed once again her ability to captivate by her refreshing presence, singing and speaking, to which must now be added her skilful dancing in the part of Jane.

Edward Worswick exemplified the spirit of youthful enthusiasm and provided an ideal partner as Timothy.  He filled the role admirably.

Much of the humour in the show was furnished by an old favourite, Bill Taylor, who played the part of harasses P.C.Boot.

In close support, Derrick Hutchinson played three parts in a confident and fitting manner and first-rage contributions came from Michael Scott-Coomber, Ignatius Calvert, Michael O’Hagan, William Manley, Tom Cowman and Anthony Thornber.

Female supporting parts were capably portrayed by Celia Speak, Pat Hargreaves, Alison MacMillan and Eileen Smith, and smaller parts by Doreen Dickinson, Eileen Stirzaker, Carol Musgrove, Christine Haslam, Christine Embery and Michael Blades.

Mr Edmond Cambien brought his long experience of the amateur stage to bear not only as producer of the show but in the interpretation of duel parts in the cast, and the society must regard itself very fortunate in being able to avail itself of his undoubted ability and enthusiasm, which was reflected in the production.

The dancing mistress was Frances Sherliker, and musical director Mr Frank Worden.

The scenery was designed and executed by Donald Kershaw, and in the company were Pat Barlow, Pat Kenyon and Philip Robinson.

The dancers were Doreen Dickinson, Mary McDonald, Eileen Atkin, Jean Waddington, Josephine Robinson, Alison MacMillan and Margaret Robinson.

Behind the scenes essential offices were undertaken by the following:  Secretary, John Cowman; House Manager, Harvey Sutcliffe; Treasurer, Anthony Thornber; Stage Manager Patrick Fullalove; Stage Staff, Neville Walmsley, Michael Embery, Frank Lofthouse, Edward Turner, Patrick Crompton, John Manley; Wardrobe, Frances Sherliker, Celia Speak; Make-up, Sheila Cottam, Hazel Dewhurst, Betty MacMillan, Betty Wright, Barbara Scattergood, Ken Taylor, John Cowman, Francis Armour; Prompts, Sheila Cottam, May Barton; Properties, Jean Aldred; Lighting and effects, Anthony Thornber.


Minutes of a meeting of the Catholic Federation Clitheroe Branch

Monthly Meeting    June 14th 1909

Chair: Rev Fr Hayes SJ (President)

Present: Fr O’Farrell, Messrs, Wells, Ingham, Coneron, Clayton, Ince, Clough, Walkden, Roger Holden, John Holden (Lowergate)

Business:  The Rev President opened the meeting by reading Fr Shorrock’s reply concerning the isolation of Clitheroe.  In his letter Fr Shorrock regretted the absence of communication between Blackburn and Clitheroe and invited the Secretary to meet the Branch Secretaries at the Catholic Club – Blackburn on May 11th.  Thereopon Fr Hayes called upon the Secretary to give his report.  The Secretary stated that the meeting consisted of some eleven Secretaries with Mr Burns in the Chair.  The latter suggested various methods of increasing the number of members and then invited questions.  In answer to the grievance of Clitheroe he said that the affair would be reported to Fr Shorrock and hoped that a speedy remedy would soon be given.  Then Fr Hayes called upon Messrs Clayton and Ince for their report of the Catholic Trades Union Meeting at Manchester.  Mr Clayton said that he could not improve on the report given in the Catholic Times.  He severely denounced the custom of allowing members to speak more than once on any “Motion”, and said that this should be mentioned that a certain M.P. had asked the number of their members: thus showing that more weight was attached to that than to the justice of their cause.

In conclusion: it was decided that canvassers should ascertain the number of Trades Unionist in each house and if possible their names.

25th October 2020 – 30th Sunday in Ordinary Time

The week ahead:

Sunday Mass

Dunsop Bridge   12 noon Saturday

Clitheroe              5pm Saturday & 9.30am Sunday

Sabden                 11am Sunday

Weekdays

10am Monday – Friday in Clitheroe

7pm Wednesday in Sabden

Feasts

Wednesday                   St. Simon and St. Jude.

Next Sunday                 ALL SAINTS

PRAYERS ARE ASKED FOR THE FOLLOWING WHO HAVE DIED RECENTLY:
Christine Fitzpatrick aged 75, Kathleen Peters aged 84, Teresa Rawcliffe aged 83, Elizabeth Howelett aged 55, Philip Mulcock aged 70

FR CHALONER – NEW ADDRESS  Fr Chaloner has moved house this week and his address is now –  3 Arrowsmith House, Larmenier Retirement Village, Preston New Road,  Blackburn BB7 7AL

NEW BOILER at St Michael & St John’s.  The existing church boiler is over 20 years old and is being replaced due to it’s condition with two smaller boilers linked together. The new boilers are more efficient and will reduce the heating costs for the church.  The work is due to take place at the end of October and will take 2 weeks

Apologies that we have no heating at the moment at St Michael & St John’s, but this is out of our control.

APPEAL FROM SVP
Has anyone a SMART TELEVISION they no longer use be willing to donate it for a family in need? If you have then please contact Vincent Murray on 07784767154

FIRST HOLY COMMUNIONS  The children who should have made their First Holy Communion in June have been invited to do so over the next few weeks.  Both in Clitheroe and Sabden two children will receive their First Holy Communion at weekend Mass.  Because of the present restrictions there can only be five other people together with each child, so different to previous plans but at least they can now receive Our Lord in Holy Communion.


LADIES GROUP UPDATE

I thought it appropriate that I update you on developments regarding the Ladies Group.

Firstly, I hope you are keeping safe and well in what a strange and unprecedented times.
Following the Government’s Coronavirus guide-lines the committee have not been meeting.
All planned monthly meetings are postponed until we can safely meet again.  I will continue to keep members updated in due course.

Barbara Parkinson, our Speakers Secretary, has a whole list of interesting people booked to come along to entertain you when the time is right.

Please stay safe and in touch with one another.  If you haven’t seen or spoken to someone for a while, give them a phone call or drop them a note, to let them know you are thinking of them, as many people still have no access to the internet and will therefore not get this message.

Carol Riley (Chair).  Tel: 01200 426769


PARISH FORUM – To be held by Zoom tomorrow 26th October at 7pm to allow people to join in and allow some social chat before the actual meeting scheduled to commence at 7.30pm.  Attendees should provide their email addresses to anhark456@aol.com to ensure they are “admitted” to the meeting.  Agenda to include Election of New Chair, Review of recent events, Parish business, Group reports.


FROM THE ARCHIVES

A detailed report from Clitheroe Advertiser & Times:

PANTOMIME 1957

FUN AND FROLIC IN NEVER NEVER LAND

FUN FOR ALL IN “QUEEN OF HEARTS”

Gay dances: Tuneful melodies

     For many years now the brightest package on Clitheroe’s Christmas tree has generally been regarded as the pantomime presented by the Catholic Pantomime Society at The Hall

This year the package is bigger and brighter and funnier than ever, full of snappy dance routines, colourful scenery, lavish costumes and breezy humour.

Right from the word go, the audience was enthralled with scene after scene of mounting excellence designed to please the eye and ear of even the most fastidious.

The choice of story this time was that evergreen favourite the “Queen of Hearts”.  These pantomime stories get thinner and thinner every year, but the audiences do not seem to mind and certainly there is no lack of other ingredients in this delectable concoction.

Principal boy and girl were once again that delightful pair Margaret O’Donnell and Audrey Smith, the one bold and dashing, the other sweet and winsome in the best pantomime tradition.

Their pleasing voices combined in many a pleasing duet while they contributed  a number of solo items of equal distinction, numbers like “The Birds and the Bees,” “Getting to Know You” and “More.” All were most enjoyable.

The Queen of Hearts was none other than our old friend Sam Bridge.  His incomparable sense of fun is given full rein in a tailor-made role to which he did full justice.

LOCAL INSTITUTIONS

      As is right and proper he poked fun at local personalities and institutions, his sallies sending the audience into shrieks of laughter.

Particularly good was his “over – the – garden – wall” effort, in which he portrayed a Lancashire housewife chattering to a neighbour and his stories as “Revolving Doors” the glamorous clippie.

His partner in fun was mainly Joe Bailey.

Particularly funny was a glorious day at the seaside – in which they looked like a couple of old ladies who had strayed from a Giles cartoon.

Technically, Mr Bailey played Black Patch, but most of the time he and Mr Bridge were engaged in knockabout comedy acts of a revue character which added spice and zest to the production.

Another figure of fun was Derek Rawcliffe as the testy King of Hearts, while John Byrne made a dashing Knave.  Derek and Sam were joined in another riot, “Rock around the Clock.”

The bold, bad King of Spades and his henchman the Knave, were admirally portrayed by William Altham and Ernest Swarbrick, while Patricia Wareing was a dainty Pink Fairy.

Other roles were portrayed by Kath Stansfield, Fred Dunne, Brenda Grant and Tommy Walker.

SIGNATURE TUNE

     The opening chorus “Bring your Smile Along” was the signature tune of the show.

It introduced a well-drilled chorus, the delightful pantomime children whose self-assurance and general air of competence belied their years.

Even the tiniest of tots carried themselves like troupers, parading and dancing with skill and precision in the most complicated of manoeuvres.

The principal speciality scene of the first half of the programme was “Vienna in Springtime,” which introduced Tommy Walker whose vigorous singing was one of the highspots of the show.

With Brenda Grant and Joan Preedy, as the dancers in beautiful white gowns, he submitted an appealing “Lovely Lady.”

Patricia Wareing was also heard to advantage in another delightful song in the scene, “Swing High, Swing Low,” while she was joined by Ernest Swarbrick in a lilting duet, “Moonlight, the Danube and You.”  Tommy Walker again excelled in “Serenade.”

LOVELY SCENES

     All these numbers were portrayed against a beautiful scenic background and colourful and competent array of dancers.

Another speciality scene, “Way Down South,” introduced a number of well-known Negro melodies like “Swanee,” by Derek Rawcliffe and the company “Tennessee” by Ernest Swarbrick, and “Midnight Choo-Choo,” an opportunity to hear the pleasing singing of Helen Turner and the slick dancing of the Tappers.

Tommy Walker’s vigorous voice was heard again in “Lucky Old Sun,” before the Darkies enjoined certain people to “Stay Out of the South,” and then Joe Bailey and Sam Bridge brought more laughs with another piece of tomfoolery, “Lily of Laguna,”

The children were again to the fore in “Are you from Dixie?,” while the company brought a rousing scene to a successful close with “On the Mississippi.”

There was a military air about the scene as Tommy Walker introduced a number of martial numbers with “The Sergeant Major’s on Parade.”

He was the exasperated sergeant major who had to deal with a couple of loony recruits – Sam Bridge and Joe Bailey, guaranteed to make any N.C.O. resign in despair.

THE TINY TOTS

      Sandra Webster gave us a delightful “Lollypop Major.” While Maria Foulker led the tiny tots in the “Toy Town Artillery.”

One of the outstanding beautiful numbers was a hunting scene, in which a picture of red-coated huntsmen came to life to sing a number of well-known hunting songs.

In contrast was a Nativity scene which unfolded as Vanessa Houlker sweetly and reverently sand, “Angelus.”

One of the most appealing items was “Apple Blossom Time,” which featured little Marlene Bridge, Mary McDonald and the Tiny Tots, while Mary Waterhouse and Vanessa Houlker gave much enjoyment with their rendering of “Wild, wild roses.”

This is but a selection of the outstanding items from a show which has more than 70 artistes and nearly 50 musical numbers.

Yet interest never flags, such is the sure direction the production has been given by the Joint producers, Mr Edmond Cambien, Mr J.K.Sherliker, Miss Frances Lofthouse and Miss Marie Sherliker.

The settings, designed and painted by Mr Donald Kershaw addes colour and realism.  Lighting effects were competently handled by Mr J.M.Wallace and Mr R.Tattersall.

A well-drilled and competent team of musicians was under the direction of Mr P.H.Robertson, who with Mr W. Coates had carried out the orchestrations.

The dancing mistresses were Miss Peggy Wilson, Miss Frances Lofthouse and Miss Marie Sherliker.

Mr R.Hargreaves, the stage manager, had the assistance of  F.Lofthouse. W.Clegg, E.Turner, A.Bridge and T.Cook, while F.Lofthouse, W.Clegg, R.Hargreaves and G.Davenport had charge of the properties.

Miss M.Bailey had charge of the wardrobe and Mr.J.K.Sherliker was hon pianist.

Mrs Bush looked after the programmes and Mrs Hargreaves and Mrs Dunn had charge of the refreshments.

Mr G.Davenport was secretary, Mr F.Dunn, treasurer, and Mr F.S.L.Moon was the auditor.

Members of the orchestra were: Violins, Mr.M.Crompton, Mr R.Townsend; ‘cello, Mr J.Crompton; flutes, Mr W.Coates, Mr C.Crompton; bass, Mr W.Marshall; trumpet, Mr J.W.Waterhouse; trombone, Mr J.Waterhouse; drums, Mr J.Turner; piano, Mr J.K.Sherliker

Members of the company were

Ladies:  A.Grant, B.Grant, R.Hargreaves, M.Hackett, V.Houlker, M.O’Donnell, J.Preedy, P.Rawsthorne, A.Smith, H.Turner, P.Wareing, D.waddington, E.Boyer

     Gentlemen: W.R.Altham, J.Bailey, S.Bridge, J.Byrne, B.Davies, F.Dunne, D.Rawcliffe, K.Stansfield, E.Swarbrick, T.Walker

 Children: E.Burgess, M.Bridge, H.Coles, B.Cook, P.Cook, M.Catlow, S.Davidson, D.Dickinson, D.Cornwell, M.Foulker, V.Geldard, A.Geldard, E.Hargreaves, H.Hargreaves, C.Hargreaves, K.Jones, S.Jaworski, M.Knowles, C.King V.Keleher, M.Keleher, C.Keleher, J.Murphy, M.McDonald, L.Murray, A.Murray, S.Murray, K.McNally, A.McDonald, A.McMillan, B.Morris, K.Morris, E.Natkin, S.Proctor, M.Preedy, E.Smithson, J.States, I.Taylor, P.Taylor, M.Waterhouse, S.Webster, A.Walmsley

Before each pantomime Edmond Cambien always got some famous celebrity from showbusiness to send a message of best wishes to the company.

 This year it was Harry Secombe who wrote:

Best Wishes for your Pantomime “Queen of Hearts” on 29th December.  Hope it’s a sell-out.  Christmas Greetings to all.

HARRY SECOMBE

London Palladium

18th October 2020 – 29th Sunday in Ordinary Time

The week ahead:-

Sunday Masses

Dunsop Bridge 12 noon Saturday

Clitheroe 5pm Saturday and 9.30am Sunday

Sabden 11am Sunday

Weekday Mass

Monday – Friday 10am Clitheroe

Wednesday 7pm Sabden

Requiem Masses this week

(Private funerals following Covid restrictions)

Peter Geldard R.I.P.
Rosemary Holden R.I.P.
Moira Hartley R.I.P.

Feasts

Monday               St. Paul of the Cross
Thursday             St. John Paul II

LATELY DEAD

Our prayers are asked for the following who have died recently:
Moira Hartley aged 70
Peter Geldard aged 82
Rosemary Holden aged 87
Christine Fitzpatrick aged 75
Kathleen Peters aged 84
Teresa Rawcliffe aged 83
Elizabeth Howelett aged 55
Joe Robinson aged 39

NEW BOILER at St Michael & St John’s.
The existing church boiler is over 20 years old and is being replaced due to its condition with two smaller boilers linked together. The new boilers are more efficient and will reduce the heating costs for the church.  The work is due to take place at the end of October and and will take 2 weeks at a cost of £20,586.00 including VAT.

Apologies that we have no heating at the moment at St Michael & St John’s, but this is out of our control.

FIRST HOLY COMMUNIONS

The children who should have made their First Holy Communion in June have been invited to do so over the next few weeks.  Both in Clitheroe and Sabden two children will receive their First Holy Communion at weekend Mass.  Because of the present restrictions there can only be five other people together with each child, so different to previous plans but at least they can now receive Our Lord in Holy Communion.

LADIES GROUP UPDATE

I thought it appropriate that I update you on developments regarding the Ladies Group.

Firstly, I hope you are keeping safe and well in what strange and unprecedented times.

Following the Government’s Coronavirus guide-lines the committee have not been meeting.

All planned monthly meetings are postponed until we can safely meet again.  I will continue to keep members updated in due course.

Barbara Parkinson, our Speakers Secretary, has a whole list of interesting people booked to come along to entertain you when the time is right.

Please stay safe and in touch with one another.  If you haven’t seen or spoken to someone for a while, give them a phone call or drop them a note, to let them know you are thinking of them, as many people still have no access to the internet and will therefore not get this message.

Carol Riley (Chair).  Tel: 01200 426769


In Plain Sight: How Caritas Salford is taking radical action to eradicate the hidden crime of Modern Day Slavery

(The text for this article is taken and adapted from material published by Caritas Salford for Anti-Slavery Day)

Sunday 18th October is Anti-Slavery Day which was first marked back in 2010 as a result of a Private Members Bill – the Anti-Slavery Day Act. It provides a much needed opportunity to remind everyone – government, local authorities, organisations, communities, families and individuals – that we all have a responsibility to look for and then slot together the separate pieces of the jigsaw, to form a complete picture of human trafficking and slavery, which is happening in plain sight in every town in every country across the world today.

Pope Francis, within the first few paragraphs of his newly published encyclical Fratelli Tutti, informs us that “millions of people today…are deprived of freedom and forced to live in conditions akin to slavery”; and even: “ …an abomination that goes to the length of kidnapping persons for the sake of selling their organs. Trafficking in persons and other contemporary forms of enslavement are a worldwide problem that needs to be taken seriously by humanity as a whole.”

The Freedom bus in Blackpool in November 2019

With over 40 million people currently in slavery world-wide, it is easy to feel overwhelmed by the sheer scale of the problem. All “persons of goodwill”, to whom the Holy Father addresses his encyclical, will share concern and a sense of responsibility for the situation but many will be uncertain about how they personally can make a difference. Certainly, lockdown restrictions and social distancing measures due to the pandemic have made spotting and reporting the signs of trafficking and modern slavery even more challenging than usual.

Caritas Salford together with the Diocese of Salford have made great strides in addressing this issue across their communities and networks, starting with their own internal processes. Mark Wiggin, Director of Caritas Salford, gives us an insight here to how they have gone about it.    “Our plans are ambitious with an overall aim to free our Diocese of modern day slavery by 2025. To help us achieve this, we have adopted a policy of Spot, Respond and Support across the Diocese and Caritas’s services and are ensuring that staff at all levels and volunteers are trained in how to recognise the signs of human trafficking and slavery, how to report what they have observed and support the victims in overcoming their trauma as appropriate and in line with our Safeguarding Policy. This is fundamental to our commitment to combatting human trafficking and until we reach that point, to improving outcomes for the victims.”

Developing partnerships and working collaboratively is considered essential. A Modern Slavery Good Practice Auditing Tool has been created and implemented jointly by Caritas Diocese of Salford, the Greater Manchester Anti-Slavery Network led by Programme Challenger’ the Pan Lancashire Anti- Slavery Partnership, GM Police, statutory and non-statutory agencies, charities, faith groups and businesses. The purpose of the auditing tool which Caritas will be piloting shortly, is to assist organisations working with homeless and vulnerable people to assess how well they are progressing towards identifying and safeguarding victims of Human Trafficking and Modern Slavery and where appropriate to signpost and refer victims to partner agencies who can assist with ongoing support and protection. As Pope Francis says, “We need to ensure that our institutions are truly effective in the struggle against all these scourges.”

The Diocese of Salford has begun the process of developing a Modern Day Slavery Statement to reflect good practice and offer a model alongside Westminster and other dioceses to develop measures to combat modern day slavery in supply chains.    All public and private organisations that procure goods and services are potentially vulnerable and even though Salford Diocese may not be legally bound by new legislation the Diocese will procures from hundreds of suppliers and it is inevitable that some of these suppliers – particularly those that use agency staff – will be potential employers of trafficked labour.

Finally the Freedom Bus, designed by our parishioner, Peter White, and funded by Caritas Salford will be touring towns in Lancashire on Anti-Slavery Day.

We too as private individuals must work to positively influence the ambitious target of 2025 set by Caritas and the Diocese of Salford by being observant and noticing the behaviour and demeanour of those around us and reporting it when our gut feeling tells us that something isn’t right. Caritas Anti-Trafficking is a response to Pope Francis’s call for Catholics and law enforcement officers around the world to join together in the fight against human trafficking and modern-day slavery. Human trafficking happens here, “hidden in plain sight”, and we all have a duty to be aware and report what we see. Moreover, we are all complicit in the poverty and exploitation that fuels human trafficking as Pope Francis tells us in Laudato Si: “In the absence of objective truths or sound principles other than the satisfaction of our own desires and immediate needs, what limits can be placed on human trafficking, organized crime, the drug trade, commerce in blood diamonds…”

Caritas Anti-Trafficking was inspired by an initiative in our parish of Our Lady of the Valley which works with East Lancashire Police in raising awareness and informing people what to do when they see something that doesn’t look right and probably isn’t. Taking the lead from this parish model, it links more widely with Greater Manchester Police, the Medaille Trust and the Santa Marta Group in Westminster. It networks with charities and groups interested in tackling modern day slavery and raises awareness within parishes, schools and groups, also offering advice, signposting and pastoral support to victims of human trafficking.

Anthony Brown (Parish Rep. Caritas DoS)


FROM THE ARCHIVES

CLITHEROE ADVERTISER AND TIMES 1933? 1934?

Clitheroe scholars’ savings

     Comments upon the disparity in savings at the various schools in the town were made at yesterday’s meeting of Clitheroe Education Committee.  The National Savings’ Association reported that at the Pendle Junior School last year £32 was saved by 28 children, and at the Roman Catholic School £90 was saved by 30 members.  The Ribblesdale Senior School saved £30 with 27 members on the boys’ side and £12 with 15 members on the girls’ side.  St James’s School with 60 members saved £80.

Alderman Standring said there was a big difference in the returns for the different schools.  “For the life of me I cannot understand the Ribblesdale Senior School being so low in the list,” he said.

The Town Clerk (Mr W.S.Weeks) said it probably depended on the way in which the system was conducted at the various schools, and whether saving was pushed or not.  If the children were encouraged to vie with each other a lot would be saved.  If the scheme were allowed to take care of itself there would not be much result.

The Rev. Father Kopp asked if the saving scheme were well known in the schools.  At the Senior School a lot of the children came from outside the borough and they may now know of it.  The scheme was greatly encouraged in the Catholic School, and the teacher in charge was very keen.  It might be that the children from outside had their own savings schemes in their respective villages.

Mr A.R.Gradwell said the figures were not altogether satisfactory.

Alderman Boothman suggested that an inquiry should be made as to the disparity.

The Chairman (Councillor Satterthwaite) said it was no business of the Education Authority.  All they could do was to congratulate the staffs of the Catholic and St James’s Schools.

The Mayor (Councillor R Manley): “I do not believe in picking one school out against another.  It is hardly fair.  The children from the outlying districts instead of bringing their money to school may be purchasing certificates in their villages.  The schools ought to be congratulated on the way in which they have hot the money together in these hard times”.

Alderman Boothman: “If we make an inquiry then we shall know whether these children from outside the borough do save at home.  No harm will be done”.

Alderman Standring said the two schools which had done best had the poorest class of children.

The Town Clerk said the matter was not within the province of the Education Committee.  The saving was done entirely out of school work.

Alderman Boothman said the work was done voluntarily by the teachers.  The report had been read publicly and it was only fair to give the headmasters of the schools with low figures an opportunity to reply.  If they did not desire to do so the matter would end.

Councillor Dewhurst moved that a copy of the report be sent to each school with a letter of congratulation.  If the cap fit, well and good.

Councillor Hughes seconded and the res0lution was carried.


CLITHEROE ADVERTISER AND TIMES 1938

“ALADDIN”

PRESENTATION AT FINAL PERFORMANCE AT THE HALL

     There was a crowded audience at the Hall on Monday evening to witness the final performance of “Aladdin,” which had been playing all week to packed houses.  Owing to the indisposition of Miss Peggy Gudgeon, the part of “Aladdin” was portrayed on Monday and Tuesday by Miss Betty Wells, but on the following night, Miss Gudgeon was sufficiently recovered to take over the role.  Miss Gudgeon infused grace and charm into her role and was admirably suited to the part of principal boy.  Performing throughout with unflagging zeal and enthusiasm, her appearances were always welcome and the songs, “Top of the Morning”, “Smile” and “Shanghai,” which she sang along with the chorus, were distinctly pleasing.  Roars of laughter were provoked by a trio, comprising Miss Gudgeon and Messrs. Sam Bridge and J.O’Donnell, with a humorous item, “The Old Sow,” but her real triumph was scored along with Miss Joan Wells with  a charming rendition of “Who are we to say.”  Their voices blended perfectly, and a storm of applause greeted the close of the number.

At the conclusion of the performance Miss Betty Wells appeared on the stage, and Miss Marie Gudgeon presented her with two boxes of chocolates, one from the whole company, for her splendid performance when deputising for Miss Gudgeon, and one from the chorus girls as an appreciation of her work in teaching the dances.  Miss Joan Wells was also the recipient of a box of chocolates from the male members of the “Walking Stick” number, but this presentation was made back-stage.

Another of the pantomimes at the Hall is now but a memory, but this talented company, enriched by experience gained at this and “pantos” of other years can look forward with confidence to the staging of many more successes.

11th October 2020 – 28th Sunday in Ordinary Time

MASSES THIS WEEK

SUNDAY MASS

Dunsop Bridge 12 noon Saturday
Clitheroe 5pm Saturday and 9.30am Sunday
Sabden 11am Sunday

Weekday Mass

Monday – Friday 10am Clitheroe
Wednesday 7pm Sabden

Feasts

Tuesday St Edward the Confessor
Thursday St Teresa of Avila
Friday St Margaret Mary Alacoque
Saturday St Ignatius of Antioch

Lately Dead:

Our prayers are asked for the following who have died recently:
Rosemary Holden
Peter Geldard


SEEDLINGS

PARENTS/CARERS OF YOUNG PEOPLE:
please check out the weekly CAFOD VIRTUAL CHILDREN’S LITURGY by visiting the CAFOD website or search CAFOD Children’s liturgy.
If you register on this website, you will be able to watch ‘live’ each Sunday at 10am. You can also download the Children’s Liturgy and illustration.
There is something for everyone and you can do as much or as little as you like – let us know what you enjoy & then we can share other resources that might be of interest to you.
Take care & stay safe all.
OLOTV Children’s Little Church Team


FROM THE ARCHIVES

CLITHEROE ADVERTISER AND TIMES 1961/62 ?

CHURCH CUSTOM OBSERVED
The “FORTY HOURS” DEVOTION, an annual custom in every R.C. church was observed at the week-end at St Michael & St John’s R.C.Church.
The devotion is essentially a continued act of intercession, The Blessed Sacrament, normally reserved in the locked veiled tabernacle on the altar, is placed in a silver-gilt monstrance on the throne of the altar.
The altar and sanctuary is decorated with flowers sent by the parishioners, and candles which are individual gifts, burn before the altar. The intercessory prayer is maintained by groups of parishioners each for a quarter on an hour.
At the opening and closing of the devotion, the Litanies of the Saints are sung and the Blessed Sacrament is carried in a procession through the church whilst the hymn, “Pange Lingua,” composed by St Thomas Aquinas in the 13th century is sung. On the second day, the Votive Mass for Peace is offered in violet vestments.
The Devotion recalls the practice of the earliest centuries when in times of danger, whether from war, sickness or famine, the people and clergy sang the litanies in procession through the streets. They later had the custom of meeting and praying in the church, by turns, for a period of 40 hours.
This time seems to be decided by the old tradition that this was the length of time that Our Lord lay in the tomb before His Resurrection. This same period of time was observed in the “watching” on Good Friday and Holy Saturday, before the Blessed Sacrament in the “Easter Sepulchre.” Beautiful specimens of these carved stone sepulchres may still be found in ancient churches throughout England.
It is an essential part of this devotion that it should be continuous not only in one church, but throughout the year, in the sense that, as the devotion ends in one church in the diocese, it should be commenced in another, the times being published for each church yearly.
“It is to be,” said Pope Paul III in 1539, “a round of prayer and supplication made by the faithful themselves, relieving each other in relays for 40 hours continually in each church in succession.
Pope Clement VIII, in 1592, said that, in the presence of numberless dangers threatening the peace of Christendom, he urged the practice of unwearied prayer, “with such an arrangement of churches and times, that at every hour of the day and night, the whole year round, the incense of prayer shall ascend without ceasing before the face of the Lord.”
The prevailing petition is undoubtedly for the as yet unrealised “peace of Christ” in the world. The Church seems never to forget that eventual peace, which St Augustine calls “the tranquillity of order,” is the only state in which man can reach his full development.
The “Forty Hours Prayer” is merely a re-echoing of the desire for this peace which runs through the Mass of each day, that, for the good of us all, the world may at last learn, “the things that are to its peace.”

CLITHEROE ADVERTISER AND TIMES JUNE 5th 1964

PARISHIONER’S GIFT TO CLITHEROE CHURCH

Two art works have been installed at St Michael & St John’s – a panel added to the reredos of the altar in the Lady Chapel and a ‘stage’ one in the Hall.

The panel on the reredos is based on a picture by Pia Angelico of the Assumption. The panels have been designed by Mr P Feeny, an old boy of Stonyhurst College, and made in the studios of John Hardman one of the only two firms in the country who do this special work. Describing them the Rector, the Rev Fr H.McEvoy writes:

NEW MEDIUM
This is an artistic medium which will be new to most, being a combination of two types of mosaic in the general sense. The larger pieces are the opus sectile and are used very much as the sections of stained glass. They are of a porcelain nature which allows the details of faces, drapery and garments etc to be painted more delicately and fired in a kiln.
The background is in opus tesserae, mosaic proper. This gives a soft and pleasant contrast to the painted sections.
This kind of work is practically imperishable. The Ravenna mosaics, placed in position in the fifth and sixth centuries are fresh today and form an invaluable guide to early Christian customs. Some years ago, reproductions of them were exhibited throughout Europe, including this country.
Colour and rhythm are the characteristics of this medium, but it is primarily an area of reflected light. The tiny pieces of mosaic are chosen for colour tonality, and the effect depends upon the angle and depth of their positioning in the cement. It is the play of light upon them which gives the impression of something live and changing, yet with a certain mysterious solemnity. They often seem at their best in a soft light such as, before the invention of glass was provided by thin sheets of alabaster in high window openings. The introduction of the opus sectile process has the advantage of removing a certain rigidity from figures purely in mosaic. The panels need to be seen more than once to appreciate the variation in effect in different lights.
|In the Hall the mural is gay and colourful and has been painted by Miss Margaret Hulme, art mistress at Clitheroe Girls’ Grammar School.
The Hall foyer has been treated with simulated oak panelling and is one of the many changes made at the hall recently.
Handsome new flooring has been laid throughout and modern toilet facilities provided. The old sash windows have been replaced by one very large window which floods the room so familiar to many as a refreshment room with generous light.
This building was originally the first church and part of the altar reredos on the wall retained for sentimental reasons is still there as a reminder.


PARISH FORUM

We intend to hold a Forum using zoom technology on Monday 26th October at 7.30pm. If you would like to join you should contact the Secretary, Ann Harkin, who will send you the agenda in advance of the meeting. Any items for the agenda or reports should also be given to Ann. Her contact is anhark456@aol.com

If you have installed the Zoom App on your computer, tablet or smartphone (recommended) all you will need to join is the meeting ID: 865 074 9717. If you don’t have the App installed click on the link https://us02web.zoom.us/j/8650749717

When logging in take your time and remember to select audio and video when the prompts appear.

The meeting will be open from 7pm for informal chats. One of the agenda items will be the appointment of the new Chair so please come and give your support.

Stay Safe
Peter Donnelly

Pope Francis – New encyclical 3rd October 2020 “Fratelli Tutti”

– “On Fraternity and Social friendship” –

“Anyone who thinks that the only lesson to be learned [from the coronavirus pandemic and the way we have responded to it] was the need to improve what we were already doing, or to refine existing systems and regulations, is denying reality.”

Summary here:

https://www.vaticannews.va/en/pope/news/2020-10/fratelli-tutti-pope-fraternity-social-friendship-short-summary.html

or download the full text here:

http://www.olotv.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/Fratelli-tutti-3-October-2020-_-Francis.pdf

First Parish Forum since Lockdown – via ZOOM!

We intend to hold a Forum using zoom technology on Monday 26th October at 7.30pm.  If you would like to join you should contact the Secretary, Ann Harkin, who will send you the agenda in advance of the meeting.  Any items for the agenda or reports should also be given to Ann.  Her contact is anhark456@aol.com

If you have installed the Zoom App on your computer, tablet or smartphone (recommended) all you will need to join is the meeting ID: 865 074 9717.  If you don’t have the App installed click on the link https://us02web.zoo.us/j/8650749717

When logging in take your time and remember to select audio and video when the prompts appear.

The meeting will be open from 7pm for informal chats.  One of the agenda items will be the appointment of the new Chair so please come and give your support.

Stay Safe

Peter Donnelly