29th August 2021 – 22nd Sunday of Ordinary Time

where can i buy clomid in singapore Mass Times Masinloc :
Sunday 28th/29th August

12 noon (Saturday) Dunsop Bridge

5pm (Saturday) Clitheroe

9.30am (Sunday) Clitheroe

11am (Sunday) Sabden

Monday           10am Clitheroe (Saints Margaret Clitherow, Anne Line, Margaret Ward.)

Tuesday           10am Clitheroe        (St. Aidan)

Wednesday     10am Clitheroe (St Edmund Arrowsmith)

Thursday          10am Clitheroe

Friday               10am Clitheroe (St. Gregory the Great)

buy cenforce 200 online Sunday 4th/5th September

12 noon (Saturday) Dunsop Bridge

5pm (Saturday) Clitheroe

9.30am (Sunday) Clitheroe

11am (Sunday) Sabden

buy Lyrica online cheap uk Baptisms by appointment with Fr. Paul.


Beginning next Sunday 5th September printed copies of the old style newsletter will once again be available from the porch,

and of course from Sabden and Dunsop.

Gradually we are getting back to normal.

One step at a time!!

______________________

MASSES RECEIVED THIS WEEK

Rita & Frank Donbavand, Fr Joe Duggan S.J.,

Special Intentions x 3, Mary Filbin, Alice & Patrick Emerson

LATELY DEAD

 Fr Joe Duggan S.J.

ANNIVERSARIES

Mary Filbin, Alice & Patrick Emerson

FR JOE DUGGAN S.J.

The death was announced this week of  Fr Joe Duggan S.J. who was the last Jesuit to serve as parish priest here prior to the parish being handed over to Salford Diocese in 2008.

He was resident priest at St Francis Xavier in Liverpool, but was on holiday in Boscombe at the time of his death.  He suffered a massive heart attack last Sunday and died in hospital on Tuesday 24th August a couple of days later.

Fr Joe took over as Parish Priest here in Clitheroe following the retirement of Fr Joseph Wareing in 2006.  This was not his first residency in the parish, he served as priest here in the late 70’s.

Reception will be on Wednesday 15th September with Mass at 7pm and his Requiem will take place at 12noon on Thursday 16th September at St Francis Xavier, Salisbury Street, Liverpool L3 8DR

R.I.P.


Live Simply Thought of the Week:

Now the nights are drawing in, please turn lights on when absolutely necessary and remember to turn off when not needed.

Before going to bed, unplug electrical appliances instead of leaving on standby. In the UK, up to £80 can be saved by unplugging these appliances.

Cutting back on energy consumption reduces the amount of electricity that power plants have to make, subsequently reducing the amount of fossil fuels that are burned each day.


LADIES GROUP

The Ladies Group are hoping to restart their monthly meetings sooooooon!
The first will be on

Wednesday, 29th September

at 7:30 in our Parish Hall.
It will be lovely to see you all again and catch up on the news.
Please be assured that we will do all we can to sanitise and make the room safe.
The Speaker will be Shirley Penman, a local lady, whose talk is about the men

of our parish who died in WW1, WW11 and Northern Ireland.
Please inform others who maybe do not get sight of this note.
———————————————————————————————–

PEOPLE’S WALK FOR THE PLANET –
CLIMATE CAMINO COMES TO CLITHEROE

The Camino to COP walk for climate  justice is passing through the Ribble Valley on 4th October for a day of hope.  Local story tellers, film makers, artists, musicians and poets will be spreading he word about the urgent need for meaningful action to address the global climate and  ecological emergency.

A workshop has been organised on Tuesday 31st August 7-9pm, in the Quaker Meeting House, Market Street, Clitheroe for people who would like help build the Coat of Hopes which will be of cut pieces of blanket, embroidered, stitched and joined, on a journey.

Like a living fable, this coat must grow as it travels on many backs, from the south coast of this island to the city of Glasgow in the north, every person who is willing, may have a piece joined to this coat. It will be a pilgrim coat, it will be a coat of hopes. The Coat of Hopes will be created as it travels the length of the country and patches produced by local groups are added. Would you like to be involved in helping to make a patch or patches for where we live?

Look to the North, and into the near future; world leaders, gathering like rooks to once again talk about the brewing storm – unstable global climate, ecological collapse and mass extinction. That is where your coat must go. Will you let them try the weight of our hopes? If they stand with us, they will delay no longer for the sake of growth, they will act now for the children of the future. May its warmth be their encouragement, and our messages guide them.

If you would prefer to sew your own patch, you can get details and request a patch pack on the website below. You can read more about the Coat of Hopes on the website www.coatofhopes.uk

Please contact Joan Veitch joanrvhome@aol.com  07745844727 or Gaye McCrum gayeparis@yahoo.co.uk  07817878310 to find out more, to express your interest or to offer your skills or help. We look forward to hearing from you.


Online Christian Retreats via Zoom

Offering a space for Christians to explore and deepen faith…

Seek ‘life in all its fullness’…

CREATED & LED BY DONNA WORTHINGTON, all retreats are an invitation to be rejuvenated and affirmed in faith, to know Christ better and to open up sacred space in order to listen to the Holy Spirit and experience a living spirituality that consoles, challenges and inspires. Varied methods enable Christians to deepen their own discipleship and travel on in their faith journeys (presentation, theological discussion, stillness, prayer, creative sessions, images, music etc).

All retreats cost £20, unless otherwise stated. For bookings, please see the website or contact Donna Worthington: drworthington@live.co.uk https://christianretreats.live

August 2021

SAINT JOSEPH | Helper of the Incarnation, Listener to dreams, Maker, Embodier of Humility… We walk alongside him to see what we can learn from him. The day will also include exploring the Jungian notion of the positive animus and how the qualities in Saint Joseph can shed light on this. Sat 14th August 2-5pm OR Mon 16th August 10am-1pm

WEEKEND RETREAT – BAREFOOT, WE ENTER HOLY GROUND | Walking in the cool of Eden’s evening, experiencing liminal spaces, seeking wisdom from the holy mountain, exploring the cave of humility and turning our gaze to the summit of transfiguration… A 3 hour retreat spread over the weekend with 3 x 1 hour sessions. Sat 28th August 11am-12pm,then 4-5pm & Sun 29th August 4-5pm (Cost £20)

September 2021

THE PARABLES? | Nice little stories or subversive arrows that turn things upside-down? Sat 18th September 2-5pm OR Mon 20th September 10am-1pm

ARIADNE’S THREAD | We journey into the maze, a red thread piercing the darkness and dancing its way back into the light… Ariadne’s thread is one of the most profound symbols in mythic stories. We will explore this compelling myth, with its maze, Minotaur and redemptive thread. Sun 5th September 2-5pm

THE FIRE, THE WELL & THE CLOAK | Explore the spirituality of St Brigid and her compelling symbolism. Wed 29th September 6.30-9pm.


From Thorneyholme Primary School, Dunsop Bridge

See the start of our work on our courtyard, which we are making into a prayer and reflection area with the main theme of Laudato Si.  The cross which is the main feature of the courtyard is made of recycled wood. The upcycled green planter is going to have a sensory garden signage on it. Animals have both been given and made by the children.  The stones are largely Laudato Si’, although we have put some of our Remembrance stones in there.  These stones were decorated by pupils, staff and parents.  Our Gardening Club is run by an ex-parent and as you can see many crops are being grown, along with flowering plants for the bees.

In addition to the above, we have worked on local conservation projects: tree planting, Curlews and sphagnum moss planting, as well as much more.


AFGHAN REFUGEES

This is an updated list of needs for Afghan refugees in Manchester. Please help if you can.   Getting to the addresses below may be problematic for you so please be in touch with Anthony Brown on 01200 422811 and we can discuss delivering a bulk supply to one of the addresses.

Dear DiSAN friends,

Staff and volunteers of Caritas Diocese of Salford are playing an active role in supporting Afghan nationals who have been evacuated to the UK.
We are co-ordinating closely with the Greater Manchester Combined Authority (GMCA).

We recognise that your particular charitable organisation may already be taking action but I also wanted to share this invitation with you to support our multi-agency Catholic response.

Based on the latest identified needs of refugees accommodated in temporary provision, donations of items on the list below is urgently requested.

Please can you share this across your own networks?

Items can be delivered to our Caritas services (details below) where we will arrange for them to be transferred to those in need.

Please help our staff by only donating products that can be used immediately by those in need.

Aptimil 200ml made up bottles please.
(This is a specific ask due to dietary requirements).
Nappies size 2 and 3     Pull-up nappies size 6 and 7      Nappy sacks for disposal
Nappy cream (Sudocrem or similar)      Sanitary products         Tena lady pants
Blankets – babies and all ages             Socks                            Slippers
Paper/crayons and similar toys for children                    Shoes

Items can be delivered to:

Caritas Red Door – Bury – St Joseph’s Presbytery, Peter Street, Bury, BL9 6AB
(Monday, Thursday and Friday, 9.00 am – 5.00 pm):

Caritas Lalley Welcome Centre, St Malachy’s School, Eggington Street, Collyhurst, Manchester, M40 7RG    (Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, 9.00 am – 4.00 pm):

Cornerstone Day Centre, 104b Denmark Road, Manchester, M15 6JS
(Monday – Friday 9.00 am – 4.30 pm):

Caritas House, 4 Nobby Stiles Drive, Manchester, M4 4FA
(Monday – Friday 9.00 am – 5.00 pm)

With grateful thanks. 

Sent on behalf of Patrick O’Dowd ~ Director, Caritas Diocese of Salford.


UNWANTED ITEMS

Those of you who have read the 21st August edition of Castle View may have noticed that the Clitheroe Rotary are collecting the following unwanted items:

Computers, Laptops, Phones, Tablets, Flat Screen monitors, for ‘IT Schools Africa’
Cables  
   
Hand or Power tools ( in good safe working order, Gardening tools Will be donated to ‘Tools for Self Reliance’, a charity based in Southampton.
   
Sewing machines Sewing machines are used by ladies who produce school uniforms etc
   
Winter coats for Men, women and children To be donated to deserving persons in the North West
   
Unwanted spectacles On behalf of Inner Wheel who will recycle and send abroad
   
Empty pill blister packs Will be passed on to Superdrug for recycling for the benefit of ‘Marie Curie’

Take any of these items along to Clitheroe Market (Bull Ring) on the first Saturday of each month commencing Saturday September 4th.

Just drive onto the Car Park find the stall and Rotarians will help you unload your car, its as simple as that.

Large items can be collected by appointment, just contact Clitheroe Rotary via email at clitheroerotarypresident@gmail.com

PLEASE DO NOT LEAVE ANY OF THE ABOVE

ITEMS IN CHURCH !!  THANKYOU


FROM THE ARCHIVES:

Report from Clitheroe Advertiser and Times

Without the Prince

by St Michael’s Players April 1956

Fun at Farmhouse when Footlights are Switched On.

     A light-hearted play about a famous star who helped a village dramatic society out of a difficulty. “Without the Prince,” which was given by the St Michael’s Players at The Hall, Lowergate, on Wednesday week and for three successive evenings, proved popular fare.

Although there is not quite enough action in the play to suit most people, there are plenty of laughs. To bring out the best qualities of the play, the cast had to use a delicate touch, and it is greatly to their credit that successive audiences so obviously enjoyed themselves.

The atmosphere of the stage was effectively transferred to an old fashioned and isolated farmhouse with interesting consequences.

Ruth Haslam, as Mary, the farmer’s daughter, spoke very clearly, and successfully presented a picture of a young girl anxious to shine as an amateur player and also to keep the interest and attention of the village “bobby”, P.C. James Hawkins.

Making the most of this part, Peter J. Fehrenbach was excellent as the solid, good-natured, honest policeman, who knew the importance of doing his duty even when it threatened to shatter his romance.

In the part of the nervous vicar (Rev.Simon Peters), who is responsible for the village society’s production of “Hamlet,” Ignatius Calvert achieved a very capable little character study, and received excellent support from Elizabeth Wright as his wife, whose quotations from Shakespeare and abdent-minded peculiarities caused many laughs.

In the last act the play takes a sudden twist with the arrival at the farhouse of an exuberant London producer, Wyndham Johns, and a famous actress, Eadeline Lees.  Derrick Hutchinson was vigorous and competent as the producer and Margaret Brown acted sedately and convincingly as the beautiful star who was fully occupied in controlling the temper of her irate companion.

The young awkward farmer’s son was cleverly portrayed by Derek Rawcliffe, who strengthened the impression that he is one of the most promising young comedians in Clitheroe.

John Brown, as the farmer whose peace was so rudely disturbed by the village society’s activities, and Cecelia Speak, as his domineering wife, who is compelled to climb down, much to the enjoyment of her husband, was cool, calm and absolutely at ease all the time he was on the stage.

John cowman, as the stranger with the lost memory, who was later identified as a famous star, acted with dignity and was equally happy in both the gay and the more serious moods of the play.  His performance was undoubtedly one of the highlights of the play.

Mary Bridge, who produced the play, is to be congratulated upon the high degree of efficiency reached by the cast as a shole.

Praise is also due to Frank Lofthouse (stage manager) and Wilfred Clegg (assistant stage manager).

In charge of special effects were Thomas Cowman; wardrobe, Margret Tyrer; properties Pat Hargreaves; lighting, James Smith; continuity, Catherine Haslam.

Mr John Loynds and Mr Harvey Sutcliffe acted efficiently as secretary and business manager respectively.

22nd August 2021 – 21st Sunday of Ordinary Time

Mass Times:  Sunday 21st/22nd August 

                       No mass 12 noon (Saturday) Dunsop Bridge – Wedding

5pm (Saturday) Clitheroe

9.30am Clitheroe

11am Sabden

Monday            10am Clitheroe

Tuesday           10am Clitheroe St. Bartholomew

Wednesday     10am Clitheroe

Thursday          10am Clitheroe Blessed Dominic

Friday               10am Clitheroe St Monica

Sunday    28th/29th August
         12 noon Dunsop Bridge (Saturday)

Mass 5pm Clitheroe (Saturday)

Mass 9.30am Clitheroe

Mass 11am Sabden

Baptisms by appointment with Fr. Paul.


From next weekend Cards and repository items will once again be on sale at the back of church and the side entrance porch.

ALSO

Beginning on Sunday 5th September printed copies of the old style newsletter will once again be available from the porch,

and of course from Sabden and Dunsop.

Gradually we are getting back to normal.

One step at a time!!

______________________

MASSES RECEIVED THIS WEEK

Julia Veenstra, Brian Ashton, Gerald Philbin, Tom Davies

LATELY DEAD

Julia Veenstra, Gerald Philbin

ANNIVERSARIES

Brian Ashton, Tom Davies, Mary Agnes Clegg


Live Simply Thought of the Week:

Ethical Fashion

Less is always best, but when you need new fashion items, better to go for brands that offer sustainable materials, fair wages, and transparent supply chains.


LADIES GROUP

The Ladies Group are hoping to restart their monthly meetings sooooooon!
The first will be on

Wednesday, 29th September

at 7:30 in our Parish Hall.
It will be lovely to see you all again and catch up on the news.
Please be assured that we will do all we can to sanitise and make the room safe.

The Speaker will be Shirley Penman, a local lady, whose talk is about the men
of our parish who died in WW1, WW11 and Northern Ireland.

Please inform others who maybe do not get sight of this note.
———————————————————————————————–

Online Christian Retreats via Zoom

Offering a space for Christians to explore and deepen faith…

Seek ‘life in all its fullness’…

CREATED & LED BY DONNA WORTHINGTON, all retreats are an invitation to be rejuvenated and affirmed in faith, to know Christ better and to open up sacred space in order to listen to the Holy Spirit and experience a living spirituality that consoles, challenges and inspires. Varied methods enable Christians to deepen their own discipleship and travel on in their faith journeys (presentation, theological discussion, stillness, prayer, creative sessions, images, music etc).

All retreats cost £20, unless otherwise stated. For bookings, please see the website or contact Donna Worthington: drworthington@live.co.uk https://christianretreats.live

August 2021

SAINT JOSEPH | Helper of the Incarnation, Listener to dreams, Maker, Embodier of Humility… We walk alongside him to see what we can learn from him. The day will also include exploring the Jungian notion of the positive animus and how the qualities in Saint Joseph can shed light on this. Sat 14th August 2-5pm OR Mon 16th August 10am-1pm

WEEKEND RETREAT – BAREFOOT, WE ENTER HOLY GROUND | Walking in the cool of Eden’s evening, experiencing liminal spaces, seeking wisdom from the holy mountain, exploring the cave of humility and turning our gaze to the summit of transfiguration… A 3 hour retreat spread over the weekend with 3 x 1 hour sessions. Sat 28th August 11am-12pm,then 4-5pm & Sun 29th August 4-5pm (Cost £20)

September 2021

THE PARABLES? | Nice little stories or subversive arrows that turn things upside-down? Sat 18th September 2-5pm OR Mon 20th September 10am-1pm

ARIADNE’S THREAD | We journey into the maze, a red thread piercing the darkness and dancing its way back into the light… Ariadne’s thread is one of the most profound symbols in mythic stories. We will explore this compelling myth, with its maze, Minotaur and redemptive thread. Sun 5th September 2-5pm

THE FIRE, THE WELL & THE CLOAK | Explore the spirituality of St Brigid and her compelling symbolism. Wed 29th September 6.30-9pm.


FROM THE ARCHIVES:

This weeks features an extract from the Church Log from 1933.

Jan 20 Fr Lomax taken to Nursing Home, Shearbank Road, Blackburn.  About

100 children were absent from school. Owing to epidemic of Influenza.

22 Death of Fr Lomax at 2am after heart attack
23 Body brought from Blackburn at 9.10pm.
24 Fr Kopp called away to sister who was dying. Dirge at 8. Fr Lynch, nephew, Oratorian arrived
25 Solemn Requiem at 103.30.  Fr Lomax was buried in our Cemetery although a grave had been reserved at Ford.
30 The Schools were closed for a fortnight: influenza.  Miss Bramley ended her teaching career on Jan 27.
Feb 2 Blessing of Candles at 8.  Blessing of St Blaise after Holy Hour.
19 Presentation to Miss Bramley.
20 Fr O’Dwyer to Dublin: his Mother had died that day.
24 Blizzard for three days.
Mar 1 Ash Wednesday.  Fr Wilcock preaches on Wednesdays.
 3 Fr Briffa arrived to help during Lent; till April 11th.
5 Q.Ore began.  Initiation of Knights at 2.30.  Procession of the Blessed

Sacrament in the evening. 150 men.  Church Porch panelled.

27 Small Ciborium lent to Fr Murray of Sabden.  Given to Sabden 1937
Apr 9 Palm Sunday.  Holy week as usual
14 Fr Magee preached Passion Sermon.
23 First meeting of new Council of Men’s Sodality after election.
30 School Sermons.  Fr Sheridan.
May 7 Procession in honour of Our Lady: School: Church only
21 Fr Donohoe spoke to the men about retreats.
26 Work on the Church began.  Scaffolding outside.
28 Sodality procession to the Playground.
June 5 Whit Monday Procession: beautiful day and Procession.
18 Procession of the B.Sact in the Church
20 Scafffold slung inside church
23 Cheque from Inspector (Claims) for £311.8.10d: Claim inclusive for 6 years.  Income Tax acknowledged: (See Nov 28 1931).  The only tax to be paid is on Ground Rent.
  The Deeds were forwarded to Fr Blackett for execution by the Registered Trustees: afterwards registered the deed with the Charity Commission as to free the property from Schedule A tax.  Notice given to local Inspector.
July 7 Fr Freeman came to supply.
Aug 7 Fr O’Dwyer holiday.
12 Lease of Cross Keys falls in New lease with Fr Blackett: Lease renewed
  Signed Nov 20
16 Painter fell from scaffold and fractured thigh.
19 Mass vestments presented by Mrs Cook & Miss Lester.
21 K.S.C. watched before the B.Sact for 24 hours.
Sept 15 Schools broke up a noon.  Loan £2000 to St Wilfrid’s.
20,21,23 Bazaar in Hall and School.  Complete success.
26 Fr Crook arrived: joined the Staff.
Oct 3 C.O.M. Election
24 Fr Visitor arrived
26 Fr Visitor left
30 All outside scaffolding removed.
Nov 3 Builders departed.
8 Self to Mount for retreat
12 Fr Briffa lectured, lantern Lecture, on life of Our Lord.
26 Re-opening celebration.  High Mass at 10.30: Fr O’Connor, Rector of Stonyhurst, H.Priest: Fr Robinson, Deacon: Fr O’Dwyer Sub-deacon:

Fr Kopp M.C. Fr Sherliker preached morning and evening

Dec 3 14 boys received into Boys’ Sodality.
6 At 7.30 Office.  B.V.M. & Benediction.
7 At 7.30 Rosary & Benediction
8 At 7.30. Reception: 18 C.O.M.: 5 men
10 Procession in Hon of the Immac Conception.  No boys walked
13 Notice from C.T.S.London: The C.T.S. cases now belong to us
25 At Midnight Mass 730 present.  Eve: Sunday: Rosary and Bened at 3.

Conf 7-9. C.Day: dinner at 2

   
  At the end of October, a new ideal Boiler fixed in the Servants’ Hall for heating the House.  Total Cost £9.13.8d.  In November the Church Boiler was repaired.  Two sections were cracked.  Taken to pieces and the parts reassembled: the two sections were paid for by Insurance Co: the work cost us £22.1.6d. 

On Dec 1: the final Acct. was paid Mr Durkin on builders work connected with the Church.  Total £800.  200 Cubic feet of new stone had been inserted: treated with Szerelmey: all wood work and iron work has been replaced, or repaired, and painted.

On Dec 19: final Acct paid Mr Watson on cleaning and decorating interior: Total £629.4.0d.  All Stone work cleaned and repaired.  Painting throughout.  Regilding. Flood lights cost £21.

On Dec 27: final Acct paid Mr Smith the joiner, for work done during the year.  Total £210.13.5d.  Panelling completed: New Main Doors.  The pitch pine comes from old school benches.  Grand Total

£1639.17.5d

In May, a defective beam below the Lady Chapel was removed and a stone arch inserted at a cost of £10.

In November, the Organ was thoroughly overhauled by Ainscough at a cost of £60.

 

15th August 2021 – The Assumption of The Blessed Virgin Mary


Mass Times
:  Sunday 15th/16th August   The Assumption

Mass 12 noon (Saturday) Dunsop Bridge

Mass 5pm (Saturday) Clitheroe

Mass 9.30am Clitheroe

Mass 11am Sabden

Monday            Mass 10am Clitheroe

Tuesday           Mass 10am Clitheroe

Wednesday     Mass 10am Clitheroe

Thursday          Mass 10am Clitheroe

Friday               Mass 10am Clitheroe (St Bernard)

Sunday    21st/22nd August
         Wedding at 12 noon Dunsop Bridge (Saturday)

Mass 5pm Clitheroe (Saturday)

Mass 9.30am Clitheroe

Mass 11am Sabden

Baptisms by appointment with Fr. Paul.

MASSES RECEIVED THIS WEEK

Deceased Latham family, Deceased Pessagno family,
Rita & Frank Donbavand x 3, Fr Michael (Fred) Dunn 90th birthday,
Special Intention, Kevin Byrne, Michael Day, Eileen Crohbleholme (operation), Clifford Chatburn,
 LATELY DEAD

Ronald Hope

ANNIVERSARIES

Clifford Chatburn, Kevin Byrne, Michael Day


Live Simply Thought of the Week:
Ethical Fashion

Less is always best, but when you need new fashion items, better to go for brands that offer sustainable materials, fair wages, and transparent supply chains.


LADIES GROUP

The Ladies Group are hoping to restart their monthly meetings sooooooon!
The first will be on

Wednesday, 29th September

at 7:30 in our Parish Hall.

It will be lovely to see you all again and catch up on the news.
Please be assured that we will do all we can to sanitise and make the room safe.
The Speaker will be Shirley Penman, a local lady, whose talk is about the men of our parish who died in WW1, WW11 and Northern Ireland.
Please inform others who maybe do not get sight of this note.


ACTION FOR LIFE CONFERENCE

Mark Wiggin attended the Action for Life on Earth 2021, the 43rd conference of the National Justice and Peace Network of England and Wales (NJPN) held 23rd -25th July at Swanwick. It attracted 200 participants from every diocese. Caritas and the Diocese of Salford played an important part contributing key speakers including Fr Eamonn Mulcahy (Spiritans), Mark Rotherham (Northern Diocese Environment Group), Dr Emma Gardener (Head of Environment, Diocese of Salford) and Bishop John Arnold

The conference, chaired by Christine Allen, Director of CAFOD, was characterised by the impressive number of young people attending who spoke passionately about the urgent need for a radical change in behaviour if the Earth is to recover from the damage inflicted on it by those in power.

Fr Eamonn led the Friday evening reflection on Laudato Si and Let Us Dream – two inspirational works by Pope Francis on the need to recognise our place in the order of the world and understand the inter-connectedness of creation of which we are only a part of as creation was for all life. Speaker Mark Rotherham, of the Northern Dioceses Environmental Group, felt it essential we transform our current economic system so that it promotes both social equality and environmental protection. “A good life-sustaining economy is about slowly down and recognising planetary boundaries” he said. He described the arms industry as “a huge shadow over our nation” and felt that we need to withdraw legitimacy from this draw on global resources and energy. Emma Gardener explained the national work of the Bishops in setting targets for carbon reduction in their dioceses. Bishop John Arnold of Salford, lead bishop on the environment for England and Wales, said Churches and faiths are making clear they want action. He shared that he has been in dialogue with COP26 president Alok Sharma MP, “trying to speak loudly to politicians”.

With less than 100 days to COP26, the NJPN conference has mobilised activists gearing up to the November COP26 climate talks in Glasgow.  Dedicated work and a massive political will is now needed if COP26 is to galvanise the leaders of the world to reduce carbon emissions and increase bio-diversity.


Online Christian Retreats via Zoom

Offering a space for Christians to explore and deepen faith…

Seek ‘life in all its fullness’…

CREATED & LED BY DONNA WORTHINGTON, all retreats are an invitation to be rejuvenated and affirmed in faith, to know Christ better and to open up sacred space in order to listen to the Holy Spirit and experience a living spirituality that consoles, challenges and inspires. Varied methods enable Christians to deepen their own discipleship and travel on in their faith journeys (presentation, theological discussion, stillness, prayer, creative sessions, images, music etc).

All retreats cost £20, unless otherwise stated. For bookings, please see the website or contact Donna Worthington: drworthington@live.co.uk https://christianretreats.live

August 2021

SAINT JOSEPH | Helper of the Incarnation, Listener to dreams, Maker, Embodier of Humility… We walk alongside him to see what we can learn from him. The day will also include exploring the Jungian notion of the positive animus and how the qualities in Saint Joseph can shed light on this. Sat 14th August 2-5pm OR Mon 16th August 10am-1pm

WEEKEND RETREAT – BAREFOOT, WE ENTER HOLY GROUND | Walking in the cool of Eden’s evening, experiencing liminal spaces, seeking wisdom from the holy mountain, exploring the cave of humility and turning our gaze to the summit of transfiguration… A 3 hour retreat spread over the weekend with 3 x 1 hour sessions. Sat 28th August 11am-12pm,then 4-5pm & Sun 29th August 4-5pm (Cost £20)

September 2021

THE PARABLES? | Nice little stories or subversive arrows that turn things upside-down? Sat 18th September 2-5pm OR Mon 20th September 10am-1pm

ARIADNE’S THREAD | We journey into the maze, a red thread piercing the darkness and dancing its way back into the light… Ariadne’s thread is one of the most profound symbols in mythic stories. We will explore this compelling myth, with its maze, Minotaur and redemptive thread. Sun 5th September 2-5pm

THE FIRE, THE WELL & THE CLOAK | Explore the spirituality of St Brigid and her compelling symbolism. Wed 29th September 6.30-9pm.

8th August 2021 – Nineteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time

Sunday    7th/8th August
Mass 12 noon (Saturday) Dunsop Bridge

Mass 5pm (Saturday) Clitheroe

Mass 9.30am Clitheroe

Mass 11am Sabden

Monday            Mass 10am Clitheroe

Tuesday           Mass 10am Clitheroe

Wednesday     Mass 10am Clitheroe (St. John Vianney)

Thursday Mass 10am Clitheroe

Friday               Mass 10am Clitheroe (The Transfiguration)

Sunday    14th/15th August  – The Assumption
         Mass 12 noon Dunsop Bridge (Saturday)

Mass 5pm Clitheroe (Saturday)

Mass 9.30am Clitheroe

Mass 11am Sabden

Baptisms by appointment with Fr. Paul.

MASSES RECEIVED THIS WEEK

Gerald Filbin, Ann Wharton, Margaret Batts, Les Collinson, Terry Peters,

LATELY DEAD

Rosemary London (nee Reid), Ronald Hope, Gerald Filbin

ANNIVERSARIES

Margaret Batts, Terry Peters, Les Collinson


 Janet is taking a week off next week Aug 9 – 13th therefore the Parish Office will be closed but she can be contacted by phone or email on

janegg@hotmail.co.uk or smsj@btinternet.com


Live Simply Thought of the Week:
Ethical Fashion

Less is always best, but when you need new fashion items, better to go for brands that offer sustainable materials, fair wages, and transparent supply chains.


LADIES GROUP

The Ladies Group are hoping to restart their monthly meetings sooooooon!
The first will be on

Wednesday, 29th September

at 7:30 in our Parish Hall.
It will be lovely to see you all again and catch up on the news.
Please be assured that we will do all we can to sanitise and make the room safe.
The Speaker will be Shirley Penman, a local lady, whose talk is about the men of our parish who died in WW1, WW11 and Northern Ireland.

Please inform others who maybe do not get sight of this note.
———————————————————————————————–

ACTION FOR LIFE CONFERENCE

Mark Wiggin attended the Action for Life on Earth 2021, the 43rd conference of the National Justice and Peace Network of England and Wales (NJPN) held 23rd -25th July at Swanwick. It attracted 200 participants from every diocese. Caritas and the Diocese of Salford played an important part contributing key speakers including Fr Eamonn Mulcahy (Spiritans), Mark Rotherham (Northern Diocese Environment Group), Dr Emma Gardener (Head of Environment, Diocese of Salford) and Bishop John Arnold

The conference, chaired by Christine Allen, Director of CAFOD, was characterised by the impressive number of young people attending who spoke passionately about the urgent need for a radical change in behaviour if the Earth is to recover from the damage inflicted on it by those in power.

Fr Eamonn led the Friday evening reflection on Laudato Si and Let Us Dream – two inspirational works by Pope Francis on the need to recognise our place in the order of the world and understand the inter-connectedness of creation of which we are only a part of as creation was for all life. Speaker Mark Rotherham, of the Northern Dioceses Environmental Group, felt it essential we transform our current economic system so that it promotes both social equality and environmental protection. “A good life-sustaining economy is about slowly down and recognising planetary boundaries” he said. He described the arms industry as “a huge shadow over our nation” and felt that we need to withdraw legitimacy from this draw on global resources and energy. Emma Gardener explained the national work of the Bishops in setting targets for carbon reduction in their dioceses. Bishop John Arnold of Salford, lead bishop on the environment for England and Wales, said Churches and faiths are making clear they want action. He shared that he has been in dialogue with COP26 president Alok Sharma MP, “trying to speak loudly to politicians”.

With less than 100 days to COP26, the NJPN conference has mobilised activists gearing up to the November COP26 climate talks in Glasgow.  Dedicated work and a massive political will is now needed if COP26 is to galvanise the leaders of the world to reduce carbon emissions and increase bio-diversity.


Online Christian Retreats via Zoom

Offering a space for Christians to explore and deepen faith…

Seek ‘life in all its fullness’…

CREATED & LED BY DONNA WORTHINGTON, all retreats are an invitation to be rejuvenated and affirmed in faith, to know Christ better and to open up sacred space in order to listen to the Holy Spirit and experience a living spirituality that consoles, challenges and inspires. Varied methods enable Christians to deepen their own discipleship and travel on in their faith journeys (presentation, theological discussion, stillness, prayer, creative sessions, images, music etc).

All retreats cost £20, unless otherwise stated. For bookings, please see the website or contact Donna Worthington: drworthington@live.co.uk https://christianretreats.live

August 2021

SAINT JOSEPH | Helper of the Incarnation, Listener to dreams, Maker, Embodier of Humility… We walk alongside him to see what we can learn from him. The day will also include exploring the Jungian notion of the positive animus and how the qualities in Saint Joseph can shed light on this. Sat 14th August 2-5pm OR Mon 16th August 10am-1pm

WEEKEND RETREAT – BAREFOOT, WE ENTER HOLY GROUND | Walking in the cool of Eden’s evening, experiencing liminal spaces, seeking wisdom from the holy mountain, exploring the cave of humility and turning our gaze to the summit of transfiguration… A 3 hour retreat spread over the weekend with 3 x 1 hour sessions. Sat 28th August 11am-12pm,then 4-5pm & Sun 29th August 4-5pm (Cost £20)

September 2021

THE PARABLES? | Nice little stories or subversive arrows that turn things upside-down? Sat 18th September 2-5pm OR Mon 20th September 10am-1pm

ARIADNE’S THREAD | We journey into the maze, a red thread piercing the darkness and dancing its way back into the light… Ariadne’s thread is one of the most profound symbols in mythic stories. We will explore this compelling myth, with its maze, Minotaur and redemptive thread. Sun 5th September 2-5pm

THE FIRE, THE WELL & THE CLOAK | Explore the spirituality of St Brigid and her compelling symbolism. Wed 29th September 6.30-9pm


FROM THE ARCHIVES:

Back in a December 2020 newsletter there was a report from the Girls School Log 1890.  This should have read 1889. This is the 1890 one.

1890  
Jan 10 School re-opened on Monday after a fortnight’s holiday.  Mary Bramley replaced Amy Dawson.  She is qualified under Article 84.  She has undertaken Standard I; whilst Martina Bramley has taken charge of Standards II & III.

The religious report received – ‘This school maintains its reputation and can be classed amongst the best in the Diocese.’

16/6d received from Mr Eastham for 6 girls.

Jan 17 20 new garments were begun the upper standards to be shown at the net inspection.
Jan 24 A short lesson on the Latin very amo was given to the whole school every morning before the calling of the registers by the Managers.
Jan 24 Visited this school without notice, tested and examined registers and attendance and found everything correct – 94 marked and present.   Manager John Hartell
Jan 31 The attendance this week has been good, the average being 95.
Feb 7 Annie Whitehead has given half-an-hours reading lesson every morning and afternoon this week to one of the lower standards.
Feb 14 Annie Whitehead still helps with the lower standards for half-an-hour each day.
Feb 24 The average attendance this week is only 80, several children being away through sickness.  Sarah Brown, a girls in Standard III, died after a fortnight’s illness, with heart disease last week.
Feb 28 Several children are still absent through sickness, chiefly bad colds.
Mar 7 Setting gathers into a band again taught to standard IV
Mar 14 The children of Standards V, VI, and VII puts in very neat patches in calico and print.
Mar 21 The Manager questioned the Upper standards in their poetry and explained several passages to them.  The 4th standard again practised the gathering and stroking specimen.
Mar 28 The girls of Standard VI and VII practised whipping a frill and setting it on to a band; and those of Standard V practised tuck-running. 8/6d received from Guardians for 1 girl at the workhouse.  5/- given to the Manager for books sold.
Apr 4 Form VIII filled up and returned to the Manager.
Apr 11 Visited this department without notice, tested and examined the registers and attendance.  81 were present and marked.  Manager

John Hartell.

Apr 11 8/- received from Mrs Harrison for 5 girls.
Apr 18 Notice received that the annual government examination and inspection will take place on Tuesday 20th May at 9 o’clock in the morning.
Apr 25 The attendance this week has been good, the average being 95.
May 2 The new registers were begun yesterday.
May 9 A large harmonium has been added to the school apparatus.
May 16 Three children have been absent this week through sickness.
   
  English according to Code of 1890
  Rep: 1      The First Snowfall                 20 lines
          II                      do                              40 lines
         III     From my arm chair               48 lines
          IV    The Village & Blacksmith     12 lines
                  Robert of Sicily                       80 lines
          V                       do                            100 lines
         VI & VII           do                            150 lines
   
May 23 The girls were examined and inspected on Tuesday morning by Mrs Hamer & Mr Johnson.  W.H.Brewer Esquire H.M.I. visited the school on Wednesday afternoon, saw the children at their ordinary work, and looked at the copy books of the upper standards saying they were very nicely written.
May 30 Holiday all week – Whit week
June 6 The schedules were received May 28th.  105 girls were examined: 104 passes in reading, 103 in writing and 98 in arithmetic giving a percentage of 97.
June 13 17 girls were admitted from the Infants school a fortnight since
   
  Report 1890
  Girls’ school.  Most satisfactory results have again been obtained in the elementary subjects but it is advisable that mental arithmetic should receive special attention.  English is very well taught.  The needlework deserves the highest praise.  The songs are very sweetly sung.  Again the Excellent merit grant is well earned.  M.Bramley is continued under article 84.  Manager John Hartell

Present staff

  Mary Ann Baynes certificated 1st class, Martina Bramley (article 50), Mary Bramley (article 84).  Manager John Hartell.
June 20 Seven children absent with Scarlet Fever
June 25 Visited this department without notice, tested Registers and Attendance, found everything correct.  76 being marked 77 being present, one had come late (Mg’t Durham)
June 27 Midsummer holidays commence today.  3/- received from Mrs Harrison for 1 girl  Grace Wilson
July 30 School visited.  D.Hamer
Aug 1 School work re-commenced on Monday July 28th.  On that day Annie Whitehead began teaching as a candidate.  The average attendance for the week is only 78, seven families are still suffering with Scarlet Fever.
Aug 8 The attendance is still poor on account of fever.
Aug 15 Last week the school was visited by Miss Green from Blackburn and Miss Jackson from Pendleton: this week by Miss Campion from Bristol
Aug 22 No school on Monday as it was a general holiday in the town.
Aug 29 Standard IV can now do their knitting and darning specimens.
Sept 5 Standard V can now do their knitting and marking specimen.
Sept 12 The attendance has been better both this week and last, the average being 90
Sept 19 Notice of the religious examination received.  It is to be on October 15th
Sept 26 Mrs Trappes and her two daughters were present during the sewing lesson on Tuesday.  They greatly admired the specimens worked.  They were brought in by the Manager who also remained during the lesson.
Oct 3 The schools were warmed for the first time to-day.
Oct 10 15/1d received from the guardians for 3 girls.
Oct 17 The religious examination took place on Wednesday the 15th, the examiner being Father Bolton.  104 were presented.
Oct 24 Holiday today and yesterday for the annual cattle fair.
Oct 31 Report of the religious examination received.  Mark of merit excellent.  Nothing is required in this school but encouragement to maintain its present efficiency.  The children were beautifully neat and orderly.
Nov 7 The children of Standard IV were taught to put in flannel patch.
Nov 14 The usual half holiday was given on Monday in honour of the election of the mayor.
Nov 21 Fractions were taught to Standard V and decimal fractions to Standard VI
Nov 28 2/8d paid to the Manager for an atlas for Annie Whitehead.
Dec 5 Standards Iv & V have been taught all their rules in arithmetic.
Dec 12 The school was visited by the Manager and father Swift.
Dec 19 The Christmas Holidays commence to-day. 2/9d received from Guardians for Grace Wilson.

 

18th July 2021 – Sixteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time

Sunday         Mass 12 noon (Saturday) Dunsop Bridge

Mass 5pm (Saturday) Clitheroe

Mass 9.30am Clitheroe

Mass 11am Sabden

Monday          Mass 10am Clitheroe

Tuesday          Mass 10am Clitheroe

Wednesday   Mass 10am Clitheroe

Thursday        Mass 10am Clitheroe

Friday              Mass 10am Clitheroe

Sunday            Mass 12 noon Dunsop Bridge (Saturday)

Mass 5pm Clitheroe (Saturday)

Mass 9.30am Clitheroe

Mass 11am Sabden

Baptisms        To arrange a Baptism, please contact Fr. Paul.

MASSES RECEIVED THIS WEEK

Martin London, Fr Leon Morris, Bill Bramwell, Joan & Chris Leeming x 2,

 Bob Driver, Terry Peters, Tony Galea, Amanda Birtchall,

Rita & Frank Donbavand, Alice & Patrick Emerson

LATELY DEAD

John Monaghan, Martin London, Amanda Birtchall, Daniel Forkin,

ANNIVERSARIES

Bob Driver, Fr Leon Morris, Bill Bramwell


PARISH FORUM

The Parish Forum due to be held on July 21st has been postponed until September when hopefully there will be more to discuss.


PARISH BUDDY SYSTEM

It has been hard for many people during the Covid restrictions to keep in touch with what is happening in the Parish and I’m sure that some people are feeling isolated.  The Communications and Media Group has been discussing ways of reaching out to people and we came up with the idea of  a Buddy System which we agreed at the last Parish Forum.

Please let us know of anybody (with their permission of course) who would welcome the odd ‘phone call to talk about Parish matters and have someone to contact for information.

We are also seeking names and contact details for people who would be prepared to act as the “Buddy”.

Please contact Anthony Brown on abrown.boggarts@googlemail.com or Janet Clegg on smsj@btinternet.com with your name and contact details if you would like to be part of this scheme and we will get back to you.


ONLINE CHRISTIAN RETREATS via ZOOM

Offering a space for Christians to explore and deepen faith—-Seek ‘life in all its fullness’…

Created and led by Donna Worthington, all retreats are on invitation to be rejuvenated and affirmed in faith, to know Christ better and to open up sacred space in order to listen to the Holy Spirit and experience a living spirituality that consoles, challenges and inspires.  Varied methods enable Christians to deepen their own discipleship and travel on in their faith journeys (presentation, theological discussion, stillness, prayer, creative sessions, images, music etc).

All retreats cost £20, unless otherwise stated.  For bookings, please see the website or contact Donna Worthington:

drworthington@live.co.uk https://christianretreats.live

JULY – AUGUST 2021

PRACTISING THE PRESENCE OF GOD  A very practical seeking out of the wisdom of the delightful Carmelite Brother Lawrence as we explore what it means to pray and experience God as the ‘centre of rest’.

Fridays 6.30- 9pm, 9th, 16th, 23rd July (Cost £80)

GOD IN ALL THINGS   We explore Ignation understandings of this and seek to see and find God in all things – in our homes, nature, the senses etc and our journey will incorporate visiting various wells of wisdom including Saint Ignatius’ Suscipe (‘Receive’) prayer.  The retreat will be a mix of discussion, prayer, paintings, music etc.  But I always think that the best way to love God is to love many things. (Van Gogh).

Saturday 10th July 2-5pm or Monday 12th July 10am – 1pm

THE HANDLESS WOMAN  Through the depths of an ancient story ‘The Handless Woman’, we will explore the wisdom which speaks to our heroic journeying.

Saturday 24th July 10am – 1pm
SAINT JOSEPH  helper of the Incarnation, Listener to dreams, Maker, Embodier of Humility…. We walk alongside him to see what we can learn from him.  The day will also include exploring the Jungian notion of the positive animus and how the qualities in Saint Joseph can shed light on this.

Saturday 14th August 2-5pm or Monday 16th August 10am – 1pm

WEEKEND RETREAT–BAREFOOT, WE ENTER HOLY GROUND

Walking in the cool of Eden’s evening, experiencing liminal spaces, seeking wisdom from the holy mountain, exploring the cave of humility and turning our gaze to the summit of transfiguration

A 3 hour retreat spread over the weekend with 3 x 1 hour sessions.

Saturday 28th August 11am – 12pm, then 4-5pm and

Sunday 29th August 4-5pm   Cost £20

————————————————————————–

CCP
CLITHEROE CHRISTIANS IN PARTNERSHIP

This month we pray for all those who have been affected by the Covid virus in our community:

Those suffering with COVID infection

  • Those helping to restore COVID sufferers to health
  • Those working on the frontline maintaining essential services
  • Those whose education has been severely disrupted over the past year
  • Those caring for the vulnerable.

Loving Lord, as we fight this new strain of Covid,

give us the strength to face whatever happens

and the sense to do what is right to keep us safe.

Help the young people see the right way that with patience we will win over this nasty disease.

 Enfold us in Your loving arms Lord,

for we know that with you by our side we can face anything.   

AMEN

A Psalm of lament and praise in a time of coronavirus

How shall we praise you, Lord, our God?

When we are locked down,

how shall we praise you?

When the doors to your house are barred,

and your people cannot assemble?

When those desperately in need of money and work

cannot even wait in the market-place?

When we have to circle round people in the street,

and to queue for shops maintaining safe distance?

When we can only communicate

by hearing on the phone,

or seeing on the screen;

or digitally messaging,

or even just waving through a window?

When we cannot meet our parents and children,

grandparents and grandchildren,

or other family members and friends?

When we cannot touch them in their flesh and blood,

to know they are really alive?

How shall we praise you?

How, like Thomas, shall we not see yet believe

that your son is raised among us?

How shall we praise you?

 

How can I praise you, Lord?

Are you plaguing us with this virus

to punish us because we have all done wrong,

or thought wrongly,

or felt wrongly,

or just been wrong?

If so, why do only some die,

and those, apparently, the ones who are the least worst or most caring amongst us?

Or are you trying to teach us a lesson?

If so, why is it so hard to learn?

And how are we to find the answer

when we do not even know the question?

Or are you still the same loving God,

coming to us in our sufferings

and opening up the way to new life in Jesus?

 

Lord, I will try to praise you.

Through gritted teeth,

I will try to praise you.

I will try to keep myself and others safe.

I will work to pray for them

and seek to help in whatever way I can.

Lord, when I cannot pray or worship

help me be aware of all your people

and your saints and angels

hovering around me,

lifting me up.

When I feel alone,

let me feel you near me,

even if only for a moment that enables me to go on.

Let me hear you say

Peace be with you”.

 

Lord, I will praise you.

Let all the peoples praise you.

Reproduced from The Methodist Church Website with kind permission from Revd Kenneth Howcroft.


FROM THE ARCHIVES:

Report by H.M.Inspectors.

6th & 7th September 1954 – Mixed Department

     Since this department was last reported on, its premises have been extended by the addition of the former parish club rooms on the upper floor of the original building.  These buildings were adapted for school use in 1939, when some alterations were made to the building, and all the accommodation in it used for this department.  There are two assembly halls (one on each floor) and seven classrooms.  Plans are in hand to partition a part of the upper hall to make an eighth classroom.  Cloakroom and washing facilities are not good.  Sanitary accommodation for the pupils is very poor: the offices on the playground are deplorable, and the two indoor wc’s provided for the senior girls are unfortunately situated next to the meals scullery, which also contains the washbasins.  There is one small playground and adjoining the premises, a school garden and about six acres of playing fields.

The department has 296 pupils, boys and girls aged from seven to fifteen years.  Numbers increased in 1952 when the first year juniors age group (7-8 years), previously taught with the infants was transferred to this department: pupils from outlying Roman Catholic schools in the rural areas around Clitheroe are admitted when they are eleven years old, and there make up more than half the total number in the senior forms.

     Essential equipment is reasonably good; the main difficulty is the lack of suitable storage for it.  An additional sewing machine and a long mirror for needlework, a better piano in the upper hall, and more reference books for the pupils’ use are among present needs.  Some 450 books on loan from the County Library form the nucleus of a useful school library, which could be more closely linked with classroom work.  This collection as yet unclassified and un-catalogued, is kept in the hall and used as a lending library by the senior pupils, most of whom borrow books for private reading both at home and in school.  The weekly library period allocated to each of the senior forms is used as a book-changing period.

The Head Master, a graduate of Glasgow University, was appointed in 1945.  His regular teaching programme of seven periods a week includes some English with each of the senior forms and history with the second year seniors.  The assistant staff consists of four women and four men, one of whom is a graduate.  Their combined teaching experience is not long, all but three having bee appointed within the last four years, four of whom without previous teaching experience.  Two of the assistant masters joined the school only a few days before it was inspected.  Among the members of the staff are several very capable and promising teachers and all work hard under the Head Masters’ leadership.  Relationships between the pupils and their teachers appear to be generally good.

In each of the junior classes most of the teaching is done by the class teachers and specialisation is limited chiefly to are, music and physical education.  In all these classes some good work has been seen and the pupils make steady progress in the basic subjects, though it is probable that this progress does not always match the abilities of individual pupils, which vary considerably.  The care taken in junior class 4 to produce written work carefully and neatly is particularly commendable and so, too, is the enthusiasm with which reading and number are tackled in junior class I.  Reading attainments in this large class of 47 seven year olds differ widely and the general level is not high.  In arithmetic, too many in this class are hardly ready for the written sums they attempt.  A more flexible programme, with fewer changes of teacher and without the emphasis on subjects and time-table periods which even a limited degree of specialisation compels, might be more appropriate to the needs of these children.  Recent staff changes have, no doubt, affected continuity of the work of the four junior classes; handwriting, in particular, might be improved here, and indeed throughout the school by the introduction of  an assistant policy.

A system of partial specialisation is operated in the senior form, where the form teacher takes his or her own form for English and Arithmetic and teaches other subjects to all forms.  Housecraft and handicraft instruction is given to the pupils in the four senior forms on four separate afternoons each week at Ribblesdale County Secondary School by members of the staff of that school.  Except that there is no course in science, the curriculum includes all the subjects usually taught in non-selective secondary schools.  Space and facilities for science teaching are limited, but it was suggested that much of what is now contained in nature study, hygiene and gardening as might be combined in a general course which would provide suitable alternatives for boys and girls in the fourth year.

Those older boys and girls are alert and willing to be interested.  They produce a fair amount of written work, much of which however is marred by poor handwriting and careless spelling.  Arithmetic follows text-books and while a good deal of competent works is done in exercise books, there is little or no practical work.  Although the syllabus which have been drawn up in the various subjects are designed as continuous courses, there is a tendency to treat the work in each form as if it were a self contained unit, with too little reference to the course as a whole.  More opportunities might be provided for group and individual work to cater for the special needs of the more able children and for those of the few who are backward.

Throughout the department some promising work is done in art and a voluntary art group meets once a week after school hours.  Light crafts are not very strongly developed.  The pupils enjoy their music lessons and they sing pleasantly.  There is a good supply of portable apparatus for physical education and vigorous lessons are taken in the playground and in the hall.  a morning assembly for corporate worship is held in the upper hall.  This hall becomes a dining room at midday.  The boys and girls dine separately, in two settings, and a start has been made to establish right standards of social behaviour.  The department takes part in local inter-school activities and widens its contacts by school visits and journeys both locally and abroad.  Regular reports are made to parents who see something of the work done in the department on Open Day.

There is a friendly spirit in this department and no lack of effort by the teachers.  They have little experience as yet of working together as a team and their separate contributions need to be more closely related to the general plan.  The schemes of work, though carefully drawn up, one rather dull and featureless and the pupils’ work is seldom outstanding in quality; there is no bad work, but here is little that is really interesting.  Here and there can be seen the gain of something much more promising; in art and in music for example, and in geography, where the pupils’ interest is around but scarcely exploited as it might be in their written work.  The Headmaster is aware of the directions in which improvement is desirable and matters which seem to need his attention were discussed with hum during the inspection.  The department now has a settled staff and organisation.  It is already doing some good work.  If the problems confronting it are faced realistically and with determination it should, as far as the limit of the premises allow, soon be going even better work.

11th July 2021 – Fifteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time

17th July – 25th July

Sunday          Mass 12 noon (Saturday) Dunsop Bridge

Mass 5pm (Saturday) Clitheroe

Mass 9.30am Clitheroe

Mass 11am Sabden

Monday          Mass 10am Clitheroe

Tuesday          Mass 10am Clitheroe

Wednesday   Mass 10am Clitheroe

Thursday        Mass 10am Clitheroe  (St. Bonaventure)

Friday              Mass 10am Clitheroe (Our Lady of Mt. Carmel)

Sunday            Mass 12 noon Dunsop Bridge (Saturday)

Mass 5pm Clitheroe (Saturday)

Mass 9.30am Clitheroe

Mass 11am Sabden

Baptisms:        To arrange a Baptism, please contact Fr. Paul.

MASSES RECEIVED THIS WEEK

John Monaghan, Joan & Chris Leeming (Diamond Anniversary),
Special Intention, Paul Trotter, Special Intention, John & Ruth Humphreys, Maura Read, Stephen Humphreys, Chris & Jim Burke, James Albert Hartley,

Rita & Frank Donbavand x 2

LATELY DEAD

John Monaghan former Head Teacher of Dunsop Bridge

ANNIVERSARIES

James Albert Hartley, Bette Coleman, Paul Trotter, Maura Read, John Monaghan


Live Simply Thought of the Week:
Try to buy locally grown fruit and vegetables, especially those which are in season.

—————————————————————————————–

PARISH FORUM

The Parish Forum due to be held on July 21st has been postponed until September when hopefully there will be more to discuss.


PARISH BUDDY SYSTEM

It has been hard for many people during the Covid restrictions to keep in touch with what is happening in the Parish and I’m sure that some people are feeling isolated.  The Communications and Media Group has been discussing ways of reaching out to people and we came up with the idea of  a Buddy System which we agreed at the last Parish Forum.

Please let us know of anybody (with their permission of course) who would welcome the odd ‘phone call to talk about Parish matters and have someone to contact for information.

We are also seeking names and contact details for people who would be prepared to act as the “Buddy”.

Please contact Anthony Brown on abrown.boggarts@googlemail.com or Janet Clegg on smsj@btinternet.com with your name and contact details if you would like to be part of this scheme and we will get back to you.


ONLINE CHRISTIAN RETREATS via ZOOM

Offering a space for Christians to explore and deepen faith—-Seek ‘life in all its fullness’…

Created and led by Donna Worthington, all retreats are on invitation to be rejuvenated and affirmed in faith, to know Christ better and to open up sacred space in order to listen to the Holy Spirit and experience a living spirituality that consoles, challenges and inspires.  Varied methods enable Christians to deepen their own discipleship and travel on in their faith journeys (presentation, theological discussion, stillness, prayer, creative sessions, images, music etc).

All retreats cost £20, unless otherwise stated.  For bookings, please see the website or contact Donna Worthington:

drworthington@live.co.uk https://christianretreats.live

JULY – AUGUST 2021

PRACTISING THE PRESENCE OF GOD  A very practical seeking out of the wisdom of the delightful Carmelite Brother Lawrence as we explore what it means to pray and experience God as the ‘centre of rest’.

Fridays 6.30- 9pm, 9th, 16th, 23rd July (Cost £80)

GOD IN ALL THINGS   We explore Ignation understandings of this and seek to see and find God in all things – in our homes, nature, the senses etc and our journey will incorporate visiting various wells of wisdom including Saint Ignatius’ Suscipe (‘Receive’) prayer.  The retreat will be a mix of discussion, prayer, paintings, music etc.  But I always think that the best way to love God is to love many things. (Van Gogh).

Saturday 10th July 2-5pm or Monday 12th July 10am – 1pm

THE HANDLESS WOMAN  Through the depths of an ancient story ‘The Handless Woman’, we will explore the wisdom which speaks to our heroic journeying.

Saturday 24th July 10am – 1pm
SAINT JOSEPH  helper of the Incarnation, Listener to dreams, Maker, Embodier of Humility…. We walk alongside him to see what we can learn from him.  The day will also include exploring the Jungian notion of the positive animus and how the qualities in Saint Joseph can shed light on this.

Saturday 14th August 2-5pm or Monday 16th August 10am – 1pm

WEEKEND RETREAT–BAREFOOT, WE ENTER HOLY GROUND

Walking in the cool of Eden’s evening, experiencing liminal spaces, seeking wisdom from the holy mountain, exploring the cave of humility and turning our gaze to the summit of transfiguration

A 3 hour retreat spread over the weekend with 3 x 1 hour sessions.

Saturday 28th August 11am – 12pm, then 4-5pm and

Sunday 29th August 4-5pm   Cost £20

————————————————————————–

CCP
CLITHEROE CHRISTIANS IN PARTNERSHIP

This month we pray for all those who have been affected by the Covid virus in our community:

  • Those suffering with COVID infection
  • Those helping to restore COVID sufferers to health
  • Those working on the frontline maintaining essential services
  • Those whose education has been severely disrupted over the past year
  • Those caring for the vulnerable.

Loving Lord, as we fight this new strain of Covid,

give us the strength to face whatever happens

and the sense to do what is right to keep us safe.

Help the young people see the right way that with patience we will win over this nasty disease.

 Enfold us in Your loving arms Lord,

for we know that with you by our side we can face anything.   

AMEN


A Psalm of lament and praise in a time of coronavirus

How shall we praise you, Lord, our God?

When we are locked down,

how shall we praise you?

When the doors to your house are barred,

and your people cannot assemble?

When those desperately in need of money and work

cannot even wait in the market-place?

When we have to circle round people in the street,

and to queue for shops maintaining safe distance?

When we can only communicate

by hearing on the phone,

or seeing on the screen;

or digitally messaging,

or even just waving through a window?

When we cannot meet our parents and children,

grandparents and grandchildren,

or other family members and friends?

When we cannot touch them in their flesh and blood,

to know they are really alive?

How shall we praise you?

How, like Thomas, shall we not see yet believe

that your son is raised among us?

How shall we praise you?

How can I praise you, Lord?

Are you plaguing us with this virus

to punish us because we have all done wrong,

or thought wrongly,

or felt wrongly,

or just been wrong?

If so, why do only some die,

and those, apparently, the ones who are the least worst or most caring amongst us?

Or are you trying to teach us a lesson?

If so, why is it so hard to learn?

And how are we to find the answer

when we do not even know the question?

Or are you still the same loving God,

coming to us in our sufferings

and opening up the way to new life in Jesus?

Lord, I will try to praise you.

Through gritted teeth,

I will try to praise you.

I will try to keep myself and others safe.

I will work to pray for them

and seek to help in whatever way I can.

Lord, when I cannot pray or worship

help me be aware of all your people

and your saints and angels

hovering around me,

lifting me up.

When I feel alone,

let me feel you near me,

even if only for a moment that enables me to go on.

Let me hear you say

Peace be with you”.

Lord, I will praise you.

Let all the peoples praise you.

Reproduced from The Methodist Church Website with kind permission from Revd Kenneth Howcroft.


FROM THE ARCHIVES:

 Clitheroe Advertiser and Times

March 15th 1957

Priest appears in colour film: Writes script

Shortly to be shown in Clitheroe is a film in which Fr Hubert McEvoy S.J. Rector of SS Michael & John’s Church, appears.

But not only does he appear in it, he has written the script and commentary.

The film, entitled “The Sacrament we Offer.” Was made by Mr Alan Turner, a Derby factory-owner, who puts into practice in his mills the social teachings of the Roman Catholic Church.

In this film he has tried to show that the Sacrifice of the Mass should be linked with daily work of all kinds in such a way as to be the daily inspiration and support of the worker.

FACTORY CHIMNEY

One shot shows incense from a thurible mingling with the smoke from a factory chimney.

The “Scottish Screen Review” said of the film, which is in colour, by the way: “By professional standards, the film is a competent job.  By amateur standards it is an outstanding achievement.

“The Times Educational Supplement” commented “Here is a film which by its simple sincerity will make a deep impression on all audiences.”

Also to be shown is More than the Trimmings,” another film by Mr Turner which shows the life and work in his Spa Lane Mills, producing trimmings of every kind from ribbons to complicated braids and tassels.

This film will, of course, have a particular appeal to Lancashire audiences.

But it goes far deeper than that.  It follows a factory girl in her integration into the life of the factory – the works council, factory chapel, Guild of Our Lady of the Factory, the youth club and the grand climax of the Factory Feast, with High Mass celebrated in one of the weaving sheds.

The loom is a raredos and the altar frontals are glowing in the surroundings where they were woven.

—————————————————————————————–`

Unknown Newspaper article

September 24th 1884

The opening of the new Lady Chapel

Special services were held at SS Michael & St John’s, on the 18th, to celebrate the opening of a new Lady Chapel, constructed on the right-hand side of the principal altar.  High Mass was sung in the morning, and a sermon preached by the Rev. Father Walter Sidgreaves, of Stonyhurst.  At the evening service the chapel was blessed, and a sermon was preached by the Rev Walter Clare of Manchester.  “Constructed at a cost of over £600, in a recess formerly used as a confessional, the features harmonising with the architecture of the church.  The floor is formed of mosaic, marble and alabaster, and the pillars, arches etc., are of marble.  Mr Nichol, of London, is the architect, and the work has been done by Mr Anstey, of London.  To the right of the entrance there is a statue of Our Lady, and in the chapel are three paintings (the work of  Mons Bouvier) depicting incidents in the life of the Blessed Virgin.  The whole work has been carried out with great , artistic skill and taste, and presents an exceedingly rich appearance.

—————————————————————————————–

Clitheroe Advertiser and Times around 1933

THE MAYOR’S THANKS

Sir, Will you please convey to the Catholic Operatic Society, and the public my sincere thanks for the sum of £11.11s.6d towards the Mayor’s Clog Fund, the proceeds of a repeat performance of “Dick Whittington”.

R.MANLEY, Mayor

4th July 2021 – Fourteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time

3rd July – 11th July

Sunday          Mass 12 noon (Saturday) Dunsop Bridge

Mass 5pm (Saturday) Clitheroe

Mass 9.30am Clitheroe

Mass 11am Sabden

Monday          Mass 10am Clitheroe

Tuesday          Mass 10am Clitheroe

Wednesday   Mass 10am Clitheroe

Thursday        Mass 10am Clitheroe

Friday              Mass 10am Clitheroe

Sunday            Mass 12 noon Dunsop Bridge (Saturday)

Mass 5pm Clitheroe (Saturday)

Mass 9.30am Clitheroe

Mass 11am Sabden

MASSES RECEIVED THIS WEEK

John Ledwick, Ann Stanley (nee Geldard)

LATELY DEAD

Marion Townsend, Kathleen Johnson (nee Jones)

ANNIVERSARIES

Ann Stanley (nee Geldard)


PARISH FORUM

The Parish Forum due to be held on July 21st has been postponed until September when hopefully there will be more to discuss.


PARISH BUDDY SYSTEM

It has been hard for many people during the Covid restrictions to keep in touch with what is happening in the Parish and I’m sure that some people are feeling isolated.  The Communications and Media Group has been discussing ways of reaching out to people and we came up with the idea of  a Buddy System which we agreed at the last Parish Forum.

Please let us know of anybody (with their permission of course) who would welcome the odd ‘phone call to talk about Parish matters and have someone to contact for information.

We are also seeking names and contact details for people who would be prepared to act as the “Buddy”.

Please contact Anthony Brown on abrown.boggarts@googlemail.com or Janet Clegg on smsj@btinternet.com with your name and contact details if you would like to be part of this scheme and we will get back to you.


ONLINE CHRISTIAN RETREATS via ZOOM

Offering a space for Christians to explore and deepen faith—-Seek ‘life in all its fullness’…

Created and led by Donna Worthington, all retreats are on invitation to be rejuvenated and affirmed in faith, to know Christ better and to open up sacred space in order to listen to the Holy Spirit and experience a living spirituality that consoles, challenges and inspires.  Varied methods enable Christians to deepen their own discipleship and travel on in their faith journeys (presentation, theological discussion, stillness, prayer, creative sessions, images, music etc).

All retreats cost £20, unless otherwise stated.  For bookings, please see the website or contact Donna Worthington:

drworthington@live.co.uk https://christianretreats.live

JULY – AUGUST 2021

PRACTISING THE PRESENCE OF GOD  A very practical seeking out of the wisdom of the delightful Carmelite Brother Lawrence as we explore what it means to pray and experience God as the ‘centre of rest’.

Fridays 6.30- 9pm, 9th, 16th, 23rd July (Cost £80)

GOD IN ALL THINGS   We explore Ignation understandings of this and seek to see and find God in all things – in our homes, nature, the senses etc and our journey will incorporate visiting various wells of wisdom including Saint Ignatius’ Suscipe (‘Receive’) prayer.  The retreat will be a mix of discussion, prayer, paintings, music etc.  But I always think that the best way to love God is to love many things. (Van Gogh).

Saturday 10th July 2-5pm or Monday 12th July 10am – 1pm

THE HANDLESS WOMAN  Through the depths of an ancient story ‘The Handless Woman’, we will explore the wisdom which speaks to our heroic journeying.

Saturday 24th July 10am – 1pm
SAINT JOSEPH  helper of the Incarnation, Listener to dreams, Maker, Embodier of Humility…. We walk alongside him to see what we can learn from him.  The day will also include exploring the Jungian notion of the positive animus and how the qualities in Saint Joseph can shed light on this.

Saturday 14th August 2-5pm or Monday 16th August 10am – 1pm

WEEKEND RETREAT–BAREFOOT, WE ENTER HOLY GROUND

Walking in the cool of Eden’s evening, experiencing liminal spaces, seeking wisdom from the holy mountain, exploring the cave of humility and turning our gaze to the summit of transfiguration

A 3 hour retreat spread over the weekend with 3 x 1 hour sessions.

Saturday 28th August 11am – 12pm, then 4-5pm and

Sunday 29th August 4-5pm   Cost £20

————————————————————————–

CCP
CLITHEROE CHRISTIANS IN PARTNERSHIP

This month we pray for all those who have been affected by the Covid virus in our community:

  • Those suffering with COVID infection
  • Those helping to restore COVID sufferers to health
  • Those working on the frontline maintaining essential services
  • Those whose education has been severely disrupted over the past year
  • Those caring for the vulnerable.

Loving Lord, as we fight this new strain of Covid,

give us the strength to face whatever happens

and the sense to do what is right to keep us safe.

Help the young people see the right way that with patience we will win over this nasty disease.

 Enfold us in Your loving arms Lord,

for we know that with you by our side we can face anything.   

AMEN

A Psalm of lament and praise in a time of coronavirus

How shall we praise you, Lord, our God?

When we are locked down,

how shall we praise you?

When the doors to your house are barred,

and your people cannot assemble?

When those desperately in need of money and work

cannot even wait in the market-place?

When we have to circle round people in the street,

and to queue for shops maintaining safe distance?

When we can only communicate

by hearing on the phone,

or seeing on the screen;

or digitally messaging,

or even just waving through a window?

When we cannot meet our parents and children,

grandparents and grandchildren,

or other family members and friends?

When we cannot touch them in their flesh and blood,

to know they are really alive?

How shall we praise you?

How, like Thomas, shall we not see yet believe

that your son is raised among us?

How shall we praise you?

How can I praise you, Lord?

Are you plaguing us with this virus

to punish us because we have all done wrong,

or thought wrongly,

or felt wrongly,

or just been wrong?

If so, why do only some die,

and those, apparently, the ones who are the least worst or most caring amongst us?

Or are you trying to teach us a lesson?

If so, why is it so hard to learn?

And how are we to find the answer

when we do not even know the question?

Or are you still the same loving God,

coming to us in our sufferings

and opening up the way to new life in Jesus?

 

Lord, I will try to praise you.

Through gritted teeth,

I will try to praise you.

I will try to keep myself and others safe.

I will work to pray for them

and seek to help in whatever way I can.

Lord, when I cannot pray or worship

help me be aware of all your people

and your saints and angels

hovering around me,

lifting me up.

When I feel alone,

let me feel you near me,

even if only for a moment that enables me to go on.

Let me hear you say

Peace be with you”.

 

Lord, I will praise you.

Let all the peoples praise you.

Reproduced from The Methodist Church Website with kind permission from Revd Kenneth Howcroft.

——————————————————————————————————–

RIBBLE VALLEY YOUTH

Below is an invitation from RVY to an event at St James’ Church
on 4th July 6pm-8pm:

 

We would love to invite you to JOIN US for our first LIVE RVY EVENT! Book in now to be part of the summer event, July 4th, 6-8pm, at St James’ Church, Clitheroe. 

It’s just £1 for entry – book in advance on the RVY website or pay on the door for a great night, including live music, games, prizes, and the RVY shop where you can grab goodies from. 

Come with your young people, join us on July 4th, 6-8pm for an incredible night.

Please Note: The RVY team has ensured the event will be fully compliant with Covid guidelines.

A graphic to publicise the event is also attached.

Please feel free to bring this to the attention of your congregations as you wish.

You can book tickets by heading to www.rvyouth.org/rvy-event or just turn up on the door, but spaces will be limited so best to book if you can. Youth leaders are welcome to accompany youth but please let us know if you are planning on doing so!


FROM THE ARCHIVES:

From the Church Notice Book

January & February1936

Jan 5th   The Holy Name of Jesus
  Lately Dead Elizabeth Mary Gudgeon
  Anniversaries John Gudgeon, William Wells, Anthony Wells, William & Ellen Dawson
    Next Sunday is the Communion day of the Children of Mary.
  Today No afternoon service.  At 6.30: Sacred Heart devotions, Sermon & Benediction.
    Bench rents will be taken after last mass.
    Our Schools re-open on Tuesday
  Monday Feast of the Epiphany and Holiday of Obligation.  Masses will be at 7, 8 and children’s Mass at 9.  At 7.30 Rosary & Benediction.  The Council of the Children of Mary will meet after evening service.  There will be no meeting on Tuesday.
    The Rescue collection will be taken this week.
    The Harvest for January is on sale.
     
Jan 12th   Feast of the Holy Family
  Anniversaries Ann Brown, Charles Turner, John Thornber
    Next Sunday is the Communion day of the Girls Sodality.
  Today At 2.30, Sunday School & Benediction.  At 6.30 Bona Mors devotions, sermon & Benediction.  The Christmas Committee will meet after evening service.
    Bench Rents will be taken after last Mass
  Monday Promoters meet at 8 o’clock
  Tuesday The Girls Sodality meet at 7.30
     
Jan 19th   Second Sunday after Epiphany
  Lately Dead Fr Joseph Blackett S.J.
  Anniversaries Fr Wilfrid Lomax, Henry Lester, Will Thos Whittaker, Martha Ann Winkle, Alexander Franey, Elizabeth Swarbrick, William Kelly
    Next Sunday is the Communion day of the Men’s Sodality
    At 6.30: Rosary, Sermon & Benediction
    Bench Rents will be taken after last Mass
    St Joseph’s Guild will meet this evening at five o’clock
  Tuesday The men’s Sodality meet in the Church at 7.30.  It is the Feast of St Agnes
  Thursday The Annual General Meeting of the Club members will take place at 8.15 in the Club.
    The Insurance Committee will meet in the Club on Thursday at seven o’clock
  Next Sunday The annual collection will be taken after all services, morning and evening, in aid of the Royal Infirmary, Blackburn
     
Jan 26th   Third Sunday after Epiphany
  Sick Thomas Wilkinson
  Anniversaries Mary Frankland, Mary Molloy, Florence Speak
  Next Sunday Is the Communion day of the Women’s Sodality and the Boys Sodality.
    At 2.30: Sunday School & Benediction
    At 6.30: Special Service, Special Sermon & Benediction.
    The Council of the Men’s Sodality meet after evening service.
  Today After all Masses and after evening service, the Annual Collection will be made in aid of the Blackburn Royal Infirmary.
  Monday The Senior Boys Sodality meet at 8 o’clock
  Tuesday A suggested order will be as follows:
    At 9 o’clock, the Blessed Sacrament will be exposed:
    At 11.30: Benediction, during which will be said prayers ordered by the Bishop.
    The Women’s Sodality meet at 7.30 for the election of officers.
  Wednesday The Council of the Children of Mary meet at 8 o’clock
     
    Collection for the Holy Childhood; Senior Dept 1.10.0
                                                             Infants Dept  10/-
    The Balance of the Christmas entertainment came to nearly £70
    Candles will be blessed before last Mass next Sunday
     
Feb 2nd   Feast of the Purification
  Sick Thomas Wilkinson
  Lately Dead Fr John Treanor S.J.
  Anniversaries Gertrude Agnes Wilson, Elizabeth Wrigley, Margaret Bolton
    Next Sunday is the Communion day of The Children of Mary.
  Today At 2.30 Sunday School & Benediction
    At 6.30 Bona Mors devotions, Sermon & Benediction
    The blessing of St Blaise for throats will be given after evening service
  Tuesday The children of Mary’s Social begins at 7.30
  Wednesday Feast of Japanese Martyrs
  Thursday Holy Hour & Confessions at 7.30
  Friday Mass at 7, 8 and 8.30
     
    Blessed candles may be obtained in the porch next Sunday
    The Rescue Collection will be made this week
    The Zambesi Collection will also be taken.
    The Harvest for February is on sale
    The Collection for the Royal Infirmary amounted to £9.15.8d for which you are heartily thanked.
Feb 9th   Septuagesima
  Sick Thomas Wilkinson
  Lately Dead Margaret Jackson
  Anniversaries Fr Edward Buckland S.J., James Joyce, Sarah Smith, Jane Thornber, John Coulthurst.
    Next Sunday is the Communion day of the Girls Sodality
  Today At 2.30: Sunday School & Benediction
    At 6.30: Sacred Heart devotions, sermon & Benediction.
    Blessed candles may be obtained in the Church porch
  Monday Promoters meet at 8 o’clock
  Tuesday The Girls Sodality meet at 7.30
    It is the Feast of Our Lady of Lourdes
     
    Next Sunday, after last Mass, and in the Hall, there will be the Annual General Meeting of the Dramatic Society, for the election of the Committee, and all members are asked to attend.
     
Feb 16th   Sexagesima
  Lately Dead Thomas Whittaker
  Anniversaries Mary Ann Chippendale, Anne Gould, Joanna McNicholls
  Next Sunday Is the Communion day of the men’s Sodality
  Today At 2.30: Sunday School & Benediction
    At 6.30: Rosary, Sermon & Benediction.
    There will be a general meeting of the Dramatic Society after last mass in the Club.
    St Joseph’s Guild will meet this evening at five o’clock
  Tuesday Men’s Sodality meet for instruction and Benediction at 7.30
     
    The quarterly collection from the Zambesi boxes amounted to £10 for which you are heartily thanked.
    Collections for the Clitheroe Nursing Association are urgently needed.  We shall show up very badly before the town if voluntary workers cannot be found to help in this charitable work.
Feb 23rd   Quinguagesima
  Sick John Walmsley
  Anniversaries Elizabeth lester, Michael Downey, Jas Marsland Bolton, Gregory Walmsley, , Robert O’Connell, Alice Marsland
     
  Next Sunday Is the Communion day of the Women’s & Boy’s Sodalities
  Today At 2.30 Sunday School & Benediction
    At 6.3.0 Rosary, sermon & Benediction
    The Council of the Men’s Sodality will meet after evening service
  Tuesday Feast of St Matthias, Apostle.  The Women’s Sodality will meet in the Hall at 7.30.  No Benediction.
  Ash Wednesday The holy season of Lent begins.  Ashes will be blessed at a quarter to nine, and distributed before 9 o’clock mass.  The fast of Lent begins on Wednesday: the Wednesdays and Fridays in Lent are days of fasting and abstinence from flesh meat.  The special sermon will be preached on Ash Wednesday evening by Fr Bernard Page S.J. of St Walburge’s, Preston.  The sermon will be at half past seven, followed by Benediction and distribution of Ashes.

The Insurance Committee will meet in the Club on Thursday evening at 7 o’clock

    The Forty Hours devotions begin next Sunday after last Mass; the opening ceremony includes procession of the Blessed Sacrament in which The Men’s Sodality are asked to take part.  Offerings of candles and flowers will be gratefully received.  An offering of 5/- is asked for large candles to be burned during the forty hours for the intention of the donor.
    The Bishop’s Pastoral is on sale, price one penny.
    The Senior Boys Socality will meet on Monday ta 8 p’clock

 

20th June 2021 – Twelfth Sunday in Ordinary Time

Today         Mass 12 (Saturday) Dunsop Bridge

Mass 5pm (Saturday) Clitheroe

Mass 9.30am Clitheroe

Mass 11am Sabden

26/27th June

Sunday      Thirteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time

Mass 12 noon (Saturday) Dunsop Bridge

Mass 5pm (Saturday) Clitheroe

Mass 9.30am Clitheroe

Mass 11am Sabden


MASSES RECEIVED THIS WEEK
Max Romer

LATELY DEAD
Max Romer

Live simply thought of the week:

Check out Sainsbury’s recycling facilities.  Sainsbury’s have extended their recycling to include plastic items: carrier bags, bread bags and cereal bags, bags and wrapping for fruit, vegetables, salad and flowers, bottle and can multipack wrapping, biscuit and cake wrappers, toilet roll and kitchen roll wrapping, rice and dry food wrappers, cheese wrappers, frozen food bags, household item wrapping, clothes bags, magazine and newspaper wrappers, baby food pouches, microwaveable pouches, pet food pouches, crisp bags, plastic or foil coffee packaging, foil confectionery wrapping, film lids from meat, fish, poultry and fruit, vegetable trays.

PARISH FORUM

The Parish Forum meeting due to be held this coming Wednesday 23rd June has been CANCELLED and has been re-scheduled to 7.30pm Wednesday 21st July, hopefully in the normal way in our Parish Hall.

PARISH BUDDY SYSTEM

It has been hard for many people during the Covid restrictions to keep in touch with what is happening in the Parish and I’m sure that some people are feeling isolated.  The Communications and Media Group has been discussing ways of reaching out to people and we came up with the idea of  a Buddy System which we agreed at the last Parish Forum.
Please let us know of anybody (with their permission of course) who would welcome the odd ‘phone call to talk about Parish matters and have someone to contact for information.
We are also seeking names and contact details for people who would be prepared to act as the “Buddy”.

Please contact Anthony Brown on abrown.boggarts@googlemail.com or Janet Clegg on smsj@btinternet.com with your name and contact details if you would like to be part of this scheme and we will get back to you.

LADIES GROUP

I hope you have kept safe and well these past months and that you are now enjoying the opportunity to reconnect with family and friends as the national restrictions begin to ease up. Spring has always been my favourite season but this year’s sense of renewal, anticipation and air of optimism as we look forward to a post-pandemic world is second to none – I hope you feel that too. I am still not sure when we will be able to meet again, but you can be sure we will meet again depending on the Government’s guidelines. Meanwhile make the best of the summer weather we are having at the moment. Carol Riley. (Chair).

CCP – CLITHEROE CHRISTIANS IN PARTNERSHIP

The CCP prayer theme has now been published on the Love Clitheroe Website. This month the focus is on homelessness..

Listen to God and let Him teach us how to love the most marginalised in society

All the different things I’ve done God has guided me.  He is the only power that I’ve got.

Sally Trench said these words in an interview with the Tablet in 2018.

It’s a sad reflection on the modern world that homelessness is increasing.  After the war it was our returning soldiers unable to adjust who finished up drinking themselves to death on meths, boot polish and gasoline.   These men didn’t last long and homeless World War II veterans disappeared from the streets.  Homelessness today is more the result of poverty, addiction and sometimes simply circumstance and misfortune.

Recently we have seen a number of destitute and homeless men in Clitheroe.  These men aren’t anything like the men Sally Trench knew.  We can help these men and by the grace of God that is what we are trying to do in Clitheroe.

But this month’s theme isn’t really about homelessness and it certainly isn’t about homelessness in Clitheroe.  It’s about God reaching out to us via inspirational people, and learning that if we can’t emulate those people we can at least support them in some small way, perhaps a little hands-on help or donations and prayer.

In the 1960s Sally Trench was just a young girl mixing and caring for destitute people on the streets of London. Her first book Bury Me in My Boots was published in 1967. The book tells how Sally had spent the previous five years sleeping rough with some of the most marginalised people in the world.  It is a tale of lived-out faith.   “I was living in this world on the bomb-sites,” she recalls, “with the rats, and the dossers. That is what I was there for, to help them die when they needed to die, or to keep them alive when they needed to keep alive.”  As one of them neared his end he said; “bury me in my boots, Sally”.   Sometimes without sleep or without food for days she lived amongst those men, experienced what they experienced, and as someone who  felt a failure and a reject too, she identified with them.

Sally was a difficult kid from an early age.  She came from an upper middle class family and was sent off to a Roman Catholic boarding school at the age of five.  She was expelled when she was fifteen.  A year or so later, walking across London at about 11:30 pm she counted eighty-seven dirty, drunk, flea-ridden old men lying on the benches, under the benches, newspaper their mattress and newspaper their cover.  Her initial reaction of disgust and evasion turned to something quite different – a recollection of her Christian roots and a realisation of what that meant.  She turned back.  In her pearls and evening dress she sat between two of the dirtiest men.  Repelled by the smell of gasoline and urine and nausea but recognising these people were utterly homeless, utterly unwanted, uncared for, and nowhere to go, she went home and prayed.  She thanked God for her parents and her home and made a pledge that she would do something about these people because God had made her aware of them.

She got a job and spent her income on food, coffee, cigarettes, clothing, and started a night vigil at two o’clock every morning.  Climbing down the drainpipe she got on her bicycle and cycled six miles across London.  She gave out the food, the coffee, the cigarettes, and the blankets and at three o’clock she returned home and went to bed again.  She did this for a year.  No one knew.

At the end of that year she walked out of her home after a row with her father and didn’t return and it was then that she spent five years sleeping rough with the men.  She wrote Bury me in my Boots on toilet paper with pens provided by the station master at Waterloo Station and kept what she wrote in Left Luggage.

One day, she encountered a young woman who had used a knitting needle to try to abort her pregnancy and was bleeding to death. She summoned a local priest to give her the last rites. It was the start of a friendship with the Jesuit Hugh Thwaites that would inspire him to retrieve the diary from Left Luggage, type it up and send it to a publisher friend.

At the age of 22 she was interviewed by Studs Terkel. With her public school education and sophisticated voice, she doesn’t sound a failure or a reject; she sounds affected,  naïve, and over confident. Was living with the Meths Men just a teenage rebellion and a short phase in her life?  According to an article in The Tablet written in 2018, absolutely not. Sally prefers to be called Sparky and it is that spark that is the most obvious outward thread that connects the work she described in Bury Me in My Boots, and her subsequent missions.  First, she ran a successful referral school for 700 “delinquent children” in London. Next, in the 1990s, she rescued children from the civil war in Bosnia and gave them a home in Britain. Until April 2017, she spent a decade living in the Western Cape in South Africa working with 7,000 children in squatter camps.

All these ventures came under the auspices of Project Spark, the charity she established with the royalties from her first book. Her remarkable life goes back to a pact with God on her seventh birthday when, troubled about the Catholic convent teaching on mortal sin, she describes a sort of revelation: “I just felt this sort of amazing feeling of a voice, saying, ‘Hey, you’re not in mortal sin, let’s make a pact.’ And so I made this pact with God. I said, ‘You died for me, so I will live for you,’ and God said, ‘That’s a stunning pact. I agree with that one.’ And that was it. I’ve stayed with Him forever. We are a team. I can do nothing without Him.”

There is a message here for all of us.   Whenever we are reminded of how little will power we seem to have and reflect on the impossible things that remarkable people do, let’s think of those words of Sally Trench and pray that we will hear God’s personal message to us, whatever that might be.

PRAYER

Let us pray for love, that we can put base emotions out of our hearts and learn to love even those who are the most difficult to love. 

Let us try and love as Jesus loves for whoever Jesus loves, we must, in the best way we can, learn to love them too. 

Let us pray that, with love, God will also give us the strength to act.

And let us pray that little by little we can gain in strength to do more and eventually perhaps do what for the moment seems impossible.

FROM THE ARCHIVES: 

Tuneful Panto at The Hall

Polish Soldiers in Chorus

POPULAR SONGS AND PERIOD COSTUMES

As year by year Cinderella and her Prince pursue the tangled paths of adventure and romance, the familiar story loses nothing of its attractiveness.

The year’s presentation of the pantomime, which opened at the Hall, Lowergate, yesterday, under the experienced guidance of Miss Phyllis Westby, the talented Great Harwood vocalist, is providing pleasant entertainment for Christmastide.

Great use has been made of every occasion to introduce delightful scenes, may enhanced by the period costumes.  The choice of songs, too, has been made with a view to satisfying popular taste and at the same time affording the principals scope opportunity to display undoubted versatility.

Miss Connie Houghton, as Cinderella, and Miss Mary Lawless, the Prince, gave a strong lead, and their singing was enjoyed particularly the fuet “Paradise For Two.”  Mr Tony Blacklock, making a welcome re-appearance as the Baron, was heartily applauded for his singing of “For You Alone.”  Miss K.Booth and Mr John Lawless, as the ugly sisters, Hygenia and Penelope, were efficiently wicked and selfish, while Master Joe Webster, as Buttons, added a generous measure of fun and thoroughly merited the honour of chief comedy role.  Other parts were played by Frances Lofthouse, as Betty; Edna Fenton, Dandini; Mrs A.Houghton, the Fairy Queen; and Bob Hothersal.

The chorus had something of an international flavour, all the men being members of the Polish Forces stationed at Low Moor.  These were Messrs. C.Wiesel, W.Ostrowski, J. Czekaj, J.Holender, B.Grabowski and T.Wianiewski.

Ladies chorus comprised M.Bailey, M.Conchie, F.Lofthouse, M.Lawson, M.Lawton, B.Punchard, E.Vose and M.Wiggans.

Children’s chorus were: – Girls: D.Barnes, M.Booth, R.Haslam, C.Hope, L.Holmes, D.Jackson, M.Patefield, B.Vose, H.Wilson, M.Walmsley, P.Wilson, S.Webster;  Boys; F.Dunne, M.Jackson, K.Jackson, F.Walmsley.

The Polish members played a burlesque ballet.  The children had an effective scene as “The Pendle Hill Hill-Billies,” introducing popular songs of the Range, and dance ensembles included Minuet, tap dances and ballet.

Mr H.B.Shaw, Mus.Bac., was musical director and conducted the Clitheroe and District Orchestra, Mr G.Hitchen was pianist and also played for rehearsals.  Mr T.Haslam was secretary and manager, Miss C.Houghton, dancing mistress, Messrs R.Geldard, P.Fullalove, A.Booth, A.Walmsley and Mr Fenton, stage staff.  Members of the Girls’ Club had charge of programmes.

Costumes for the principals were loaned, but the remainder were made by ladies of the congregation.

Original scenery for the production was designed and made by 2nd-Lieutenant Melczyslaw Kosik, who in civil life is a surveyor.  He made the scenery as an expression of thanks to Miss C.Houghton, who taught him to speak English.

13th June 2021 – Eleventh Sunday in Ordinary Time

Today        Mass 12 (Saturday) Dunsop Bridge

Mass 5pm (Saturday) Clitheroe

Mass 9.30am Clitheroe

Mass 11am Sabden

19/20th June

Sunday    Twelfth Sunday in Ordinary Time

Mass 12 noon (Saturday) Dunsop Bridge

Mass 5pm (Saturday) Clitheroe

Mass 9.30am Clitheroe

Mass 11am Sabden


MASSES RECEIVED THIS WEEK
In thanksgiving for safe delivery, Winifred Covey,
Grace Warren, Rita & Frank Donbavand
LATELY DEAD
Win Hargreaves

ANNIVERSARIES
Winifred Covey, Grace Warren

Live simply thought of the week:
Become a green purchaser: before buying, think ‘do I need it or just want it’.


LADIES GROUP

I hope you have kept safe and well these past months and that you are now enjoying the opportunity to reconnect with family and friends as the national restrictions begin to ease up. Spring has always been my favourite season but this year’s sense of renewal, anticipation and air of optimism as we look forward to a post-pandemic world is second to none – I hope you feel that too. I am still not sure when we will be able to meet again, but you can be sure we will meet again depending on the Government’s guidelines. Meanwhile make the best of the summer weather we are having at the moment.

Carol Riley. (Chair).


PARISH BUDDY SYSTEM

It has been hard for many people during the Covid restrictions to keep in touch with what is happening in the Parish and I’m sure that some people are feeling isolated.  The Communications and Media Group has been discussing ways of reaching out to people and we came up with the idea of a Buddy System which we agreed at the last Parish Forum.

Please let us know of anybody (with their permission of course) who would welcome the odd ‘phone call to talk about Parish matters and have someone to contact for information.

We are also seeking names and contact details for people who would be prepared to act as the “Buddy”.

Please contact Anthony Brown on abrown.boggarts@googlemail.com or Janet Clegg on smsj@btinternet.com with your name and contact details if you would like to be part of this scheme and we will get back to you.


ONLINE CHRISTIAN RETREATS VIA ZOOM

Offering a space for Christians to explore and deepen faith…

Seek ‘life in all its fullness’

CREATED & LED BY DONNA WORTHINGTON, all retreats are an invitation to be rejuvenated and affirmed in faith, to know Christ better and to open up sacred space in order to listen to the Holy Spirit and experience a living spirituality that consoles, challenges and inspires.  Varied methods enable Christians to deepen their own discipleship and travel on in their faith journeys (presentation, theological discussion, stillness, prayer, creative sessions, images, music etc).

Courses and training are also offered so individuals and groups can explore Scripture, prayer and faith’s themes and feel equipped to become prayer leaders in their own communities.

All retreats cost £20, unless otherwise stated.  For bookings, please see the website or contact Donna Worthington:
drworthington@live.co.uk
https://christianretreats.live

2021 – June – July

PETER, A DEEPLY HUMAN CHARACTER : We became alert to the spiritual dynamic in his journey in order to explore this path
Sat 12th June 2-5pm OR Mon 14th June 10am – 1pm

If people wish to, they may attend Part 2 of this retreat on Peter on Sunday 27th June 2 – 5pm

(REPEAT) THE PROBLEM OF EVIL:  This issue has caused many to question their faith.  We explore this from various angles in order to think the whole subject through, understand various approaches and see how this does not need to be an obstacle to faith.
Sat 23rd June 6.30pm – 9pm

THE HANDLESS WOMAN : Through the depths of an ancient story ‘The Handless Woman’, we will explore the wisdom which speaks to our heroic journeying.
Sat 24th July 10am – 1pm


CCP – CLITHEROE CHRISTIANS IN PARTNERSHIP

The CCP prayer theme has now been published on the Love Clitheroe Website. This month the focus is on homelessness…

Listen to God and let Him teach us how to love the most marginalised in society

“All the different things I’ve done God has guided me.  He is the only power that I’ve got.”    Sally Trench said these words in an interview with the Tablet in 2018.

It’s a sad reflection on the modern world that homelessness is increasing.  After the war it was our returning soldiers unable to adjust who finished up drinking themselves to death on meths, boot polish and gasoline. These men didn’t last long and homeless World War II veterans disappeared from the streets.  Homelessness today is more the result of poverty, addiction and sometimes simply circumstance and misfortune.

Recently we have seen a number of destitute and homeless men in Clitheroe.  These men aren’t anything like the men Sally Trench knew.  We can help these men and by the grace of God that is what we are trying to do in Clitheroe.

But this month’s theme isn’t really about homelessness and it certainly isn’t about homelessness in Clitheroe.  It’s about God reaching out to us via inspirational people, and learning that if we can’t emulate those people we can at least support them in some small way, perhaps a little hands-on help or donations and prayer.

In the 1960s Sally Trench was just a young girl mixing and caring for destitute people on the streets of London. Her first book Bury Me in My Boots was published in 1967. The book tells how Sally had spent the previous five years sleeping rough with some of the most marginalised people in the world.  It is a tale of lived-out faith.   “I was living in this world on the bomb-sites,” she recalls, “with the rats, and the dossers. That is what I was there for, to help them die when they needed to die, or to keep them alive when they needed to keep alive.”  As one of them neared his end he said; “bury me in my boots, Sally”.   Sometimes without sleep or without food for days she lived amongst those men, experienced what they experienced, and as someone who felt a failure and a reject too, she identified with them.

Sally was a difficult kid from an early age.  She came from an upper middle class family and was sent off to a Roman Catholic boarding school at the age of five.  She was expelled when she was fifteen.  A year or so later, walking across London at about 11:30 pm she counted eighty-seven dirty, drunk, flea-ridden old men lying on the benches, under the benches, newspaper their mattress and newspaper their cover.  Her initial reaction of disgust and evasion turned to something quite different – a recollection of her Christian roots and a realisation of what that meant.  She turned back.  In her pearls and evening dress she sat between two of the dirtiest men.  Repelled by the smell of gasoline and urine and nausea but recognising these people were utterly homeless, utterly unwanted, uncared for, and nowhere to go, she went home and prayed.  She thanked God for her parents and her home and made a pledge that she would do something about these people because God had made her aware of them.

She got a job and spent her income on food, coffee, cigarettes, clothing, and started a night vigil at two o’clock every morning.  Climbing down the drainpipe she got on her bicycle and cycled six miles across London.  She gave out the food, the coffee, the cigarettes, and the blankets and at three o’clock she returned home and went to bed again.  She did this for a year.  No one knew.

At the end of that year she walked out of her home after a row with her father and didn’t return and it was then that she spent five years sleeping rough with the men.  She wrote Bury me in my Boots on toilet paper with pens provided by the station master at Waterloo Station and kept what she wrote in Left Luggage.

One day, she encountered a young woman who had used a knitting needle to try to abort her pregnancy and was bleeding to death. She summoned a local priest to give her the last rites. It was the start of a friendship with the Jesuit Hugh Thwaites that would inspire him to retrieve the diary from Left Luggage, type it up and send it to a publisher friend.

At the age of 22 she was interviewed by Studs Terkel. With her public school education and sophisticated voice, she doesn’t sound a failure or a reject; she sounds affected, naïve, and over confident. Was living with the Meths Men just a teenage rebellion and a short phase in her life?  According to an article in The Tablet written in 2018, absolutely not. Sally prefers to be called Sparky and it is that spark that is the most obvious outward thread that connects the work she described in Bury Me in My Boots, and her subsequent missions.  First, she ran a successful referral school for 700 “delinquent children” in London. Next, in the 1990s, she rescued children from the civil war in Bosnia and gave them a home in Britain. Until April 2017, she spent a decade living in the Western Cape in South Africa working with 7,000 children in squatter camps.

All these ventures came under the auspices of Project Spark, the charity she established with the royalties from her first book. Her remarkable life goes back to a pact with God on her seventh birthday when, troubled about the Catholic convent teaching on mortal sin, she describes a sort of revelation: “I just felt this sort of amazing feeling of a voice, saying, ‘Hey, you’re not in mortal sin, let’s make a pact.’ And so I made this pact with God. I said, ‘You died for me, so I will live for you,’ and God said, ‘That’s a stunning pact. I agree with that one.’ And that was it. I’ve stayed with Him forever. We are a team. I can do nothing without Him.”

There is a message here for all of us.   Whenever we are reminded of how little will power we seem to have and reflect on the impossible things that remarkable people do, let’s think of those words of Sally Trench and pray that we will hear God’s personal message to us, whatever that might be.

PRAYER

Let us pray for love, that we can put base emotions out of our hearts and learn to love even those who are the most difficult to love. 

Let us try and love as Jesus loves for whoever Jesus loves, we must, in the best way we can, learn to love them too. 

Let us pray that, with love, God will also give us the strength to act.

And let us pray that little by little we can gain in strength to do more and eventually perhaps do what for the moment seems impossible.


FROM THE ARCHIVES:

From the School Log book 1942:

Aug 10 Monday.  School re-opened.  Mrs Quinn is in the Infirmary recovering from an operation.  Miss Margaret Smith, new from College, is supplying.  27 new scholars were admitted from the Infants Dep’t.  173 on roll.
Aug 18 Mrs Wrigley, Education officer, doubts whether Miss Smith is eligible for supply work in view of the Board’s circular directing young teachers to certain areas.  He is writing to the Board for a ruling.
Aug 19 The Evacuees, numbering about 2 dozen, have their meal now in a separate room.  Mr Scott advised the change.
Aug 24 Francis Marsland slipped in the Castle Grounds and cut his forehead.  The accident happened at about 1pm in the Castle Grounds after the Canteen Meal.  It would be interesting to know who is legally responsible for safety of scholars between 12.30 and 1.30.  It is difficult to expect scholars to remain on school premises a whole hour.
Aug 31 Miss Margaret Smith, at the request of the Board of Education ceased work today, Monday, as supply teacher.
Aug 26 Mr Scott, H.M.I. visited school today from 10.30 – 12.45.  He spoke in each class and attended the school meal, after which he made some suggestions for improvement.
Sept 1 Today, Tuesday, Mrs Cornwell commenced as Supply Teacher in From I during the continued absence of Mrs Quinn.
Sept 11 The average attendance at the School Canteen is 70 Catholics and 24 Evacuees.  The two groups dine separately.
Sept 18 Rev Fr Kopp today examined registers and found them correct.  School closed today at 4pm for the September Holiday.  On Friday, Sept 11, we had a full scale air raid practice.  The warden, Mr Albistone was fully satisfied.
Sept 28 School re-opened today Monday after a weeks holiday.  Mrs Quinn is still absent and Mrs Cornwell supplying.  Two scholars have so far been reported killed in active service.  John Chatburn and William Bugler, also Joseph Dixon (of Gt Harwood).
Oct 8 H.M.Inspector Mr Scott has forwarded a critical report of the school canteens following his recent visit.  In the authority of someone this report was published in full in the local press.  Ribblesdale School being mentioned by name and congratulated; other schools being indicated by letter.  This seems a clear case of divulging a confidential document.
Oct 30 School was closed this afternoon Friday to allow town children to attend a dance for Y.M.C.A.funds.
Nov 1 Sunday.  The assembled scholars and teachers this afternoon presented Rev Fr Kopp S.J, with £10 on the occasion of his leaving Clitheroe for Loyola Hall, Rainhill, after a rectorship here of twelve years.
Nov 4 Rev Fr Kopp left Clitheroe to-day, Wednesday.
Nov 11 Rev George Francis Gallagher, S.J. arrived to-day in succession to Fr Kopp.
Nov 2 Mrs Quinn re-commenced work to-day after a protracted absence due to an illness and operation.  Mrs Cornwell ceased as supply Teacher on Friday Oct 30 at noon and has transferred  to the staff of St Mary’s School, Burnley.
Nov 16 From to-day Monday, schools open at 9.30am.
Nov 20 Every effort is being made to urge children to be immunised against diphtheria.  There are four children not now immunised.
Nov 23 Mrs Quinn and Miss Wharton are absent ill to-day.  The classes are being temporarily amalgamated and the Time Table adjusted.
Nov 28 Schools are being again asked to co-operate in serving milk and meals during the Christmas holiday.
Nov 30 A list of St Augustine’s evacuees has been requested, some American gifts are to be sent them.  Mrs Quinn and Miss Wharton returned after a week’s absence.
Dec 3 James Carden scholar fell in the Castle Grounds and damaged his left wrist to-day.  Thursday, at 1pm after the canteen meal.  He received medical attention.
Dec 1 Miss Wharton was absent this afternoon (Tuesday) through illness.
Dec 2 Miss Wharton returned to-day.
Dec 4 Library books continue to be changed thrice weekly – Mon, Wed, Fri.  Scholars have recently assisted by gifts and a Raffle (£22) a local fund for soldiers.  Their total contributions in goods, etc, is about £50.  The Christmas Fayre is to-morrow, Saturday.  A recital of Table Manners for scholars at Canteens emanating from Ribblesdale has been passed to schools from the Education Officer.  It seems to us an impertinence.  Regulations relative to Teachers’ absences and salary adjustments are to be revised.  The Headmaster of this school has been asked to become an ‘Emergency Billeting Officer Assistant’ and has consented.
Dec 17 In preparation for the Holidays simple celebrations took place in the various classes.  Calendars and Christmas Cards were designed.  Christmas Carols and Hymns were sung by the whole school.
Dec 18 School closed to-day, Friday, for the Christmas Holiday (two weeks).
Dec 14 The assistant inspector spent the whole of to-day, Monday, in school.  He examined all classes and was present at the Canteen Dinner.  He expressed himself as generally satisfied.
1943            Jan 4 School re-opened to-day, Monday, after two weeks holiday.  149 on roll.  The Canteen continued its service, 52 partook of a meal.
Jan 5 The Headmaster has erected a Trapeze and Climbing ropes in the Assembly Hall which serves as the School Gymnasium.
Jan 6 School closed for the Feast of the Epiphany.  The Assistand Inspector was in the Evacuees Dept upstairs all day.
Jan 29 The Climbing Ropes and Trapeze which have been purchased for the school Gymnasium are proving of great use in physical training lessons.  The scholars are delighted with them – an acquisition which has so far been the privilege of secondary schools.
Feb 8 There was an Air Raid Siren Test to-day.
Feb 10 Preparations are afoot for the (1) County Scholarship (March 6th). (2) Convent Scholarship (March 13th), 3 Preston Scholarship (March 13th)
Feb 12 A revised exclusion list (Infectious Diseases) has been issued.
Feb 15 Mrs Quinn was absent today, Monday, through illness.  The class (Form I) is being temporarily amalgamated.
Feb 19 Mrs Quinn is still absent.  School now opens daily at 9am.
Feb 28 Mrs Quinn returned to duty to-day, Thursday, after an absence of 8 school days (illness).
Mar 5 Children availing themselves of the Canteen facilities are gradually increasing in number.  To-day there were 75.  The Headmaster stays every day to supervise and a further teacher helps in the distribution of meals.  A census has been taken of children who have milk and meals.
Mar 8 For the last three Sundays the Headmaster has taken a group of 10 Boys for an afternoon’s cycle ride in the surrounding country.  The excursions have proved very enjoyable and many places of local historical and geographical interest have been visited.
  Sunday Feb 21st – Worston, Downham, Chatburn, Sawley, Grindleton, West Bradford, Waddington, Mytton, Whalley, Wiswell, Clitheroe.  25 miles
  Sunday  Feb 28th Chatburn, Sawley, Holden Clough, Newton, Whitewell, Bashall Eaves, Clitheroe.  28 miles
  Sunday March 7th Holden Clough, Slaidburn, Newton, Dunsop Bridge, Little Bowland, Chipping, Higher Hodder, Clitheroe.  35 miles.
  There were 78 for Dinner to-day.  Miss Wharton is taking an appointment as assistant at St Mary’s, Billington on April 1st.  Rev Fr Gallagher S.J. is arranging for the post to be filled.
  Miss Allaun and Mr Pearson, Physical Training supervisors, have visited the school 3 times in the past several days and expressed themselves very pleased with the recent additions to the Gymnasium.
Mar 9 With the advent of better weather, football on the field has again started.
  A plaque commemorating Warships Week has been exhibited in the school.  Competitions have been arranged for Wings for Victory week.
  School has been closed to-day, as is customary: Shrove Tuesday.
Mar 10 The children attended Mass and distribution of ashes at 8.45am
Mar 15 Miss Wharton was absent to-day owing to illness of her mother in Grimsby.  Her class is amalgamated with another.
Mar 18 Miss Wharton returned to-day, Thursday after three days absence.
Mar 20 Rev Fr Gallagher S.J. Correspondent Manager, has been ill for the past week, since returning from his brother’s funeral, and was taken to-day to St Joseph’s Hospital, Preston.
Mar 26 Preparations are afoot for celebrating ‘Wings for Victory@ week.
Mar 31 Miss Wharton, an assistant here for 15 years, left to-day, Wed, to take an appointment as assistant at St Mary’s, Billington.  Two Evacuee Teachers – Misses Dawson of Sabden – left to-day to take appointments in Burnley. Two Teachers are now upstairs – Mrs Bennett and Mrs Chapman.
  Registers examined and found correct.
Apr 1 Mrs Jackson is supplying, pending arrival of new Teacher, Miss Kathleen Wright.
Apr 7 Two vans removed 42 dual desks to-day to Manchester.
Apr 8 The Science Room, now used as the new Dining Hall, was washed thoroughly to-day.
Apr 10 The Headmaster fitted a new bell in the Dining Hall to-day, Saturday  a proposal to disperse the Evacuees among All St James’ and Pendle Junior is deferred till the Summer Holiday when the transition will be more easily arranged.
  John Bullock recently fractured his arm during Physical Exercise in the Assembly Hall.
  Joseph Sherliker had a front tooth broken by a boy swinging on the bar near the Lavatories.
Apr 19 The Headmaster is allowing four older boys to remove the netting from all windows.  It harbours dust, prevents access of light and is unsightly.  The particular emergency which caused it to be put up has we hope passed.  This removal will allow all windows to be thoroughly cleaned by the men during Easter.
  The Headmaster visited Fr Gallagher in Preston on Saturday.  He is improving.
Apr 21 Cricked matches were recently started on the field.  Netball is in full sing.  Marbles, however have been the chief interest for four weeks.  @Marble Alley’ has been well patronised.
Apr 22 Mrs Jackson completed her supply service to-day in place of Miss Wharton
  Maundy Thursday children attended mass at 9 o’clock.  Closure of school at 4pm for the Easter vacation.  Miss Wharton to-day concluded her teaching service at this school.  She commences as assistant at St Mary’s Billington, on May 1st.  The children and teachers gave her presents and expressed good wishes.
May 3 School re-opened to-day, Monday after the Easter holiday.  Miss Kathleen Wright, former scholar to-day succeeded Miss Wharton as assistant.
May 7 Friday, School closed this afternoon for a ‘Wings for Victory’ Dance.
May 10 Wings for Victory week commenced to-day.  Visits from Air Force officers are arranged.
May 11 Senior Girls and Boys assisted in a display on the Castle, netball and games 2.30 – 4pm.
May 14 School was closed this afternoon to allow attendance of children a a Savings function at the Castle.  Bridge building at Brungerley followed and Low Moor Mill chimney was felled at 4.45
May 28 Attendance is moderate.  There is a fair amount of minor illness.
May 29 The Headmaster accompanied ten boy cyclists to the Upper Hodder to-day, Sunday; distance 23 miles.
Jun 3 Feast of the Ascension and a school holiday.
Jun 11 School closed to-day, Friday, for the Whitsuntide vacation which this year comes late.  As the midsummer holiday is shortly after, it has been decided to reduce the Whitsuntide break to two days and extend the Summer holiday to five weeks.  Rev Fr Gallagher S.J. Rector returned to-day after his illness.
Jun 13 The Headmaster accompanied twelve boys on a cycle ride via Sawley, Holden, Slaidburn, Newton, Dunsop, Whitewell, Chipping, Thornley & Higher Hodder.  Distance 28 miles.
Jun 16 School re-opened to-day, Wednesday, after two days holiday.  Attendance is good.  Two evacuee classes still use two rooms upstairs under Mrs Bennett and Mrs Smith (of London and Sawley respectively).
  This evening at 4.30 the Headmaster accompanied several boys to a farm near Slaidburn by cycle to visit a former scholar.  Teturn journey was via Dunsop and Whitewell.
Jun 22 Tuesday evening.  Ten boys and the Headmaster cycled to Clitheroe Reservoir and from there to the Flyde Reservoir beyond Slaidburn which supplies Blackpool.  The contrast in sizes was interesting.  The return was via Holden and Sawley.
Jun 21 Trinity Sunday.  Nearly forty children were consecrated in the two Sodalities to-day.
Jun 24 Thursday.  Feast of Corpus Christi and a school holiday.  Headmaster accompanied 10 boys on a days cycle tour by way of Whitewell, Dunsop, Trough of Bowland, Abbeystead, Lancaster, Cockerham, Pilling, Fleetwood, Elswick, Broughton, Longridge and Hurst Green (80 miles). The following watersheds were crossed: – Ribble, Hodder, Wyre, Bonder, Lune.  The Castle and St Peter’s Cathedral were visited at Lancaster.  They crossed the ferry on the Wyre at Knott End.  It was a very enjoyable day.
Jun 25 Preparations are being made for promotion of classes at the close of the school holiday.
Jun 29 Tuesday.  Feast of SS Peter & Paul, a school holiday.  Seventy children accompanied by the Headmaster and three teachers spent a day at Dunsop Bridge.  25 children and the Headmaster cycled, while the rest travelled by bus at 7.20am.  Half of the day was passed in the Trough of Bowland and the afternoon in the Whitendale Valley.  The party attended 9 o’clock mass at St Hubert’s.  The cyclists returned via Slaidburn and Sawley.
Jul 2 School closed to-day for 5 weeks holiday.  The Evacuees who have used the upper floor almost continuously since Sep 1939 are leaving to-day.  They take with them our best wishes.  Some adjustments are now being made in our own classes.
Jul 5 The Headmaster and two teachers accompanied fifty children on a days outing to Southport by train at 7am, arriving at 9am.  They indulged in boating on the Lake and other amusements.  Arrived home at 9.45pm after a very enjoyable day.
  The Headmaster and a few boys have spent the first week of the school holiday in re-arranging desks and classrooms, following the removal of the evacuees, and erecting the school stage which will now be a permanent fixture, we hope.  There will be an assembly hall as well as a gymnasium.
  Brenda Walmsley has been awarded a County Scholarship while Eileen Pollard and Margaret Bowker have won Governors’ Scholarships tenable at Convent of Notre Dame, Blackburn.  Brian Keogh goes to Preston Catholic College as fee-paying pupil.

 

6th June 2021 – Corpus Christi

Today              Mass 12 (Saturday) Dunsop Bridge

Mass 5pm (Saturday) Clitheroe

Mass 9.30am Clitheroe

Mass 11am Sabden

Monday          Mass 10am Clitheroe

Tuesday          Mass 10am Clitheroe

Wednesday   Mass 10am Clitheroe

Thursday        Mass 10am Clitheroe

Friday              Mass 10am Clitheroe The Sacred Heart of Jesus

Sunday   (Eleventh Sunday in Ordinary Time)

Mass 12 noon (Saturday) Dunsop Bridge

Mass 5pm (Saturday) Clitheroe

Mass 9.30am Clitheroe

Mass 11am Sabden

MASSES RECEIVED THIS WEEK:
Katie Collins, Rita & Frank Donbavand, Bernard & Ronnie Higgins,
For successful operation, Thanks for safe delivery, Special Intentions x 3,
Millicent Driver, Theresa Pinch, Edmund Carus, Win Hargreaves

LATELY DEAD
Theresa Pinch, Edmund Carus, Win Hargreaves

ANNIVERSARIES
Millicent Driver


Laudato Si Week 2021

Please take the time to watch:

Critical Opportunities in 2021 to create change: call for an integral path. | Laudato Si Week Day 1
https://youtu.be/uDxeC13iQSo


LADIES GROUP

I hope you have kept safe and well these past months and that you are now enjoying the opportunity to reconnect with family and friends as the national restrictions begin to ease up. Spring has always been my favourite season but this year’s sense of renewal, anticipation and air of optimism as we look forward to a post-pandemic world is second to none – I hope you feel that too. I am still not sure when we will be able to meet again, but you can be sure we will meet again depending on the Government’s guidelines. Meanwhile make the best of the summer weather we are having at the moment.
Carol Riley. (Chair).


PARISH BUDDY SYSTEM

It has been hard for many people during the Covid restrictions to keep in touch with what is happening in the Parish and I’m sure that some people are feeling isolated.  The Communications and Media Group has been discussing ways of reaching out to people and we came up with the idea of  a Buddy System which we agreed at the last Parish Forum.

Please let us know of anybody (with their permission of course) who would welcome the odd ‘phone call to talk about Parish matters and have someone to contact for information.

We are also seeking names and contact details for people who would be prepared to act as the “Buddy”.

Please contact Anthony Brown on abrown.boggarts@googlemail.com or Janet Clegg on smsj@btinternet.com with your name and contact details if you would like to be part of this scheme and we will get back to you.


ONLINE CHRISTIAN RETREATS VIA ZOOM

Offering a space for Christians to explore and deepen faith…

Seek ‘life in all its fullness’

CREATED & LED BY DONNA WORTHINGTON, all retreats are an invitation to be rejuvenated and affirmed in faith, to know Christ better and to open up sacred space in order to listen to the Holy Spirit and experience a living spirituality that consoles, challenges and inspires.  Varied methods enable Christians to deepen their own discipleship and travel on in their faith journeys (presentation, theological discussion, stillness, prayer, creative sessions, images, music etc).

Courses and training are also offered so individuals and groups can explore Scripture, prayer and faith’s themes and feel equipped to become prayer leaders in their own communities.

All retreats cost £20, unless otherwise stated.  For bookings, please see the website or contact Donna Worthington:
drworthington@live.co.uk
https://christianretreats.live

2021 – June – July

PETER, A DEEPLY HUMAN CHARACTER : We became alert to the spiritual dynamic in his journey in order to explore this path
Sat 12th June 2-5pm OR Mon 14th June 10am – 1pm

If people wish to, they may attend Part 2 of this retreat on Peter on Sunday 27th June 2 – 5pm

(REPEAT) THE PROBLEM OF EVIL:  This issue has caused many to question their faith.  We explore this from various angles in order to think the whole subject through, understand various approaches and see how this does not need to be an obstacle to faith.
Sat 23rd June 6.30pm – 9pm

THE HANDLESS WOMAN : Through the depths of an ancient story ‘The Handless Woman’, we will explore the wisdom which speaks to our heroic journeying.
Sat 24th July 10am – 1pm


CCP – CLITHEROE CHRISTIANS IN PARTNERSHIP

The CCP prayer theme has now been published on the Love Clitheroe Website. This month the focus is on homelessness…

Listen to God and let Him teach us how to love the most marginalised in society

In Itchy Park“All the different things I’ve done God has guided me.  He is the only power that I’ve got.”    Sally Trench said these words in an interview with the Tablet in 2018.

It’s a sad reflection on the modern world that homelessness is increasing.  After the war it was our returning soldiers unable to adjust who finished up drinking themselves to death on meths, boot polish and gasoline. These men didn’t last long and homeless World War II veterans disappeared from the streets.  Homelessness today is more the result of poverty, addiction and sometimes simply circumstance and misfortune.

Recently we have seen a number of destitute and homeless men in Clitheroe.  These men aren’t anything like the men Sally Trench knew.  We can help these men and by the grace of God that is what we are trying to do in Clitheroe.

But this month’s theme isn’t really about homelessness and it certainly isn’t about homelessness in Clitheroe.  It’s about God reaching out to us via inspirational people, and learning that if we can’t emulate those people we can at least support them in some small way, perhaps a little hands-on help or donations and prayer.

In the 1960s Sally Trench was just a young girl mixing and caring for destitute people on the streets of London. Her first book Bury Me in My Boots was published in 1967. The book tells how Sally had spent the previous five years sleeping rough with some of the most marginalised people in the world.  It is a tale of lived-out faith.   “I was living in this world on the bomb-sites,” she recalls, “with the rats, and the dossers. That is what I was there for, to help them die when they needed to die, or to keep them alive when they needed to keep alive.”  As one of them neared his end he said; “bury me in my boots, Sally”.   Sometimes without sleep or without food for days she lived amongst those men, experienced what they experienced, and as someone who felt a failure and a reject too, she identified with them.

Sally was a difficult kid from an early age.  She came from an upper middle class family and was sent off to a Roman Catholic boarding school at the age of five.  She was expelled when she was fifteen.  A year or so later, walking across London at about 11:30 pm she counted eighty-seven dirty, drunk, flea-ridden old men lying on the benches, under the benches, newspaper their mattress and newspaper their cover.  Her initial reaction of disgust and evasion turned to something quite different – a recollection of her Christian roots and a realisation of what that meant.  She turned back.  In her pearls and evening dress she sat between two of the dirtiest men.  Repelled by the smell of gasoline and urine and nausea but recognising these people were utterly homeless, utterly unwanted, uncared for, and nowhere to go, she went home and prayed.  She thanked God for her parents and her home and made a pledge that she would do something about these people because God had made her aware of them.

She got a job and spent her income on food, coffee, cigarettes, clothing, and started a night vigil at two o’clock every morning.  Climbing down the drainpipe she got on her bicycle and cycled six miles across London.  She gave out the food, the coffee, the cigarettes, and the blankets and at three o’clock she returned home and went to bed again.  She did this for a year.  No one knew.

At the end of that year she walked out of her home after a row with her father and didn’t return and it was then that she spent five years sleeping rough with the men.  She wrote Bury me in my Boots on toilet paper with pens provided by the station master at Waterloo Station and kept what she wrote in Left Luggage.

One day, she encountered a young woman who had used a knitting needle to try to abort her pregnancy and was bleeding to death. She summoned a local priest to give her the last rites. It was the start of a friendship with the Jesuit Hugh Thwaites that would inspire him to retrieve the diary from Left Luggage, type it up and send it to a publisher friend.

At the age of 22 she was interviewed by Studs Terkel. With her public school education and sophisticated voice, she doesn’t sound a failure or a reject; she sounds affected, naïve, and over confident. Was living with the Meths Men just a teenage rebellion and a short phase in her life?  According to an article in The Tablet written in 2018, absolutely not. Sally prefers to be called Sparky and it is that spark that is the most obvious outward thread that connects the work she described in Bury Me in My Boots, and her subsequent missions.  First, she ran a successful referral school for 700 “delinquent children” in London. Next, in the 1990s, she rescued children from the civil war in Bosnia and gave them a home in Britain. Until April 2017, she spent a decade living in the Western Cape in South Africa working with 7,000 children in squatter camps.

All these ventures came under the auspices of Project Spark, the charity she established with the royalties from her first book. Her remarkable life goes back to a pact with God on her seventh birthday when, troubled about the Catholic convent teaching on mortal sin, she describes a sort of revelation: “I just felt this sort of amazing feeling of a voice, saying, ‘Hey, you’re not in mortal sin, let’s make a pact.’ And so I made this pact with God. I said, ‘You died for me, so I will live for you,’ and God said, ‘That’s a stunning pact. I agree with that one.’ And that was it. I’ve stayed with Him forever. We are a team. I can do nothing without Him.”

There is a message here for all of us.   Whenever we are reminded of how little will power we seem to have and reflect on the impossible things that remarkable people do, let’s think of those words of Sally Trench and pray that we will hear God’s personal message to us, whatever that might be.

PRAYER

Let us pray for love, that we can put base emotions out of our hearts and learn to love even those who are the most difficult to love. 

Let us try and love as Jesus loves for whoever Jesus loves, we must, in the best way we can, learn to love them too. 

Let us pray that, with love, God will also give us the strength to act.

And let us pray that little by little we can gain in strength to do more and eventually perhaps do what for the moment seems impossible.


FROM THE ARCHIVES:

Priest pulls new club’s first pint

 This week we go back to when our Parish Centre opened on Wednesday May 11th 1977.  It shows Fr Willoughby pulling the first pint accompanied by parishioners most of whom sadly are no longer with us.

The Ceremonial pulling of the first pint by Parish Priest Fr E.X.Willoughby marked the opening of the new £15,000 community centre at SS Michael and John’s Church, Clitheroe.

But Fr Willoughby didn’t drink the first glass of ale.  Instead it was bottled and sent to social centre secretary Mr Tony Thornber who had to miss the opening because of a spell in hospital.

“Tony had done a lot of hard work and we felt the honour of the first drink should go to him,” Fr Willoughby explained.

“Putting the finishing touches to the centre, he fell down some steps and tore ligaments in his knee.  I took the bottle to him in hospital and even though he is on a strict diet I suspect he will have had a little tipple.”

The community centre was officially opened with a special Mass in the lounge area – the site where the town’s Roman Catholics met before the church was built.

The Mass was concelebrated by Fr Willoughby and Fr Bernard Dobson and attended by more than 300 parishioners – most of whom stayed behind to sample the delights of the centre.

These included a luxurious lounge, bar facilities and a games room complete with a full-size billiard table, pool table and darts board.  Work on the hall, which should provide one of the largest dance areas in the town, will be completed by late autumn and a regular programme of social events will be arranged.

The centre will be very familiar to most of the town’s Catholics, the former infant school buildings and the church hall having been converted during the past six months, mainly through voluntary effort, to provide a proper meeting place for the parish.

“Celebrating the Mass and pulling the first pint were marvellous moments for me,” said Fr Willoughby.  “It was the culmination of months of hard work and planning by a lot of people in the parish.

Another highlight of the evening was the presentation of life membership certificates to Mr Jim Holmes and his wife, Bernadine, for the work they had done at the centre.

Manned by volunteers, the centre will be open each week night as well as Sunday lunchtime.  Membership already exceeds 300 and Fr Willoughby expects the final number will be far higher.