14th March 2021 – 4th Sunday of Lent (Mothering Sunday)

13th March the week ahead:-

Mass 12 noon (Saturday) Dunsop Bridge

Mass 5pm        (Saturday) Clitheroe

Mass 9.30am       (Sunday)    Clitheroe

Mass 11am           (Sunday)    Sabden

 

Monday                No Public Mass

Tuesday                 Mass 10am

Wednesday           Mass 10am                 St. Patrick

Thursday               Mass 10am

Friday                     Mass 10am                 St. Joseph

 

Fifth Sunday in Lent            

Mass 12 noon (Saturday) Dunsop Bridge

Mass 5pm                 (Saturday) Clitheroe

Mass 9.30am  (Sunday)    Clitheroe

Mass 11am     (Sunday)    Sabden


The Word This Week

There were two remarkable moments in the story of the Old Testament where God saved his people; one was in the escape from Egypt – we’ll keep that for the Easter Vigil. The other was the end of their second exile, this time in Babylon, which we hear of today. Of course there was an even greater moment when God saved his people: the work of Jesus Christ, the Son of God – and we hear Jesus tell Nicodemus about that today. So today’s theme is “salvation”: but to understand “being saved”, we must ask “What from?” Saved from slavery, from exile, from human enemies – these are all clear. But the last and greatest salvation brought by Jesus is harder to understand: saved from sin and death. These threaten us as much as any other enemy, and our salvation in Jesus is as real as any other.


Baptism We welcome into God’s family Thomas James Sidney Farragher who was baptised this weekend at St. Michael and St. John’s.


Forty Martyrs  The new online exhibition on the Forty Martyrs of England and Wales, put together by the British Province Archives, Dr Jan Graffius, Curator at Stonyhurst, and others, can now be viewed here: www.jesuitcollections.org.uk. Drawing on the Province’s extensive collection of papers and relics, it tells the story of the martyrs with short talks, text and pictures.


MASSES RECEIVED THIS WEEK

Sick Person, Pat Addy x 2, Special Intention, John Shorter, Ann Fox

Eric Whitehead, Rita & Frank Donbavand, Jeremy Grout-Smith

 LATELY DEAD

Pat Addy, Jeremy Grout-Smith

ANNIVERSARIES

Eric Whitehead


PALM SUNDAY AND HOLY WEEK SERVICES

Unbelievably, we’re nearly at Easter again (I’m not sure if this has been the longest or the shortest year ever).  Once again, many thanks to everyone for their generous donation of time, especially when the snow and rain arrived.  I’m guessing that June may bring some changes, but I’m not counting any chickens as there will be a few surprises along the way.   Ann Harkin

Please see below the Service times.

Palm Sunday Mass

12 noon Saturday (Dunsop Bridge)

5.30pm Saturday (Clitheroe)

9.30am Sunday (Clitheroe)

11am Sunday (Sabden)

Monday 29th March – Mass 10am (Clitheroe)

Tuesday 30th March – Mass 10am (Clitheroe)

Wednesday 31st March – Mass 10am (Clitheroe)

EASTER TRIDUUM:

HOLY THURSDAY

Mass of the Lord’s Supper 7pm (Clitheroe)

GOOD FRIDAY

The Passion of the Lord 3pm (Clitheroe)
Stations of the Cross 11am in Sabden

Stations of the Cross at 11am in Dunsop Bridge

HOLY SATURDAY

Easter Vigil 5pm (Clitheroe)

EASTER SUNDAY MASS

9am (Dunsop Bridge)

9.30am (Clitheroe)

11am (Sabden)

May I ask for volunteers for

Monday, Thursday and Friday please.   A.Harkin


LIVE SIMPLY THOUGHT FOR THE WEEK

Eat less (and better) meat and dairy. (Supermarkets have lots of dairy substitutes)

You might be surprised to discover that farming animals is one of the biggest contributors to climate change.

Meat and dairy production causes 14.5% of planet-warming gases.


LENT

This year our focus is on “Walking for Water.”

Abdella, who is a young man, lives in an extremely remote and mountainous part of Ethiopia, where it is getting hotter and drier each year. It takes him ten hours every day to collect water for his family.

Throughout Lent each time you resist a treat or give up something put the money you save in an envelope and then return the envelope at Easter.


LAUDATO SI!

Global Healing: a series of talks for Lent 2021. This is Week 3:  https://youtu.be/WYeK0JOBiUo


UPDATE!

CYCLE RIDE – CLITHEROE TO LOURDES

‘Our ‘virtual journey’ began on Saturday 13th February. We are now 20 days into the trip and arrived at Chanoy in Burgundy still making our way south eastwards to the Rhone Valley .  Burgundy is renowned for its superb wines, excellent gastronomy and rich architectural heritage. Buildings of note include a large number of medieval and Renaissance homes, churches and monasteries.  Many are topped by the region’s distinctive, multihued tile roofs. Most of the monasteries belonged either to the Cistercian order or their bitter rivals, at the time, the powerful and wealthy Benedictines directed from Cluny.

Our plan to‘arrive’ in Lourdes on Easter Sunday 4th April, after completing the challenge of cycling the 1071 miles route from Clitheroe in 51 days.

Back in the ‘real world’ we have cycled twenty different local loops. We have had dry weather for the last week with Sunday being particularly warm and the last couple of days being extremely cold. We aim to be passing through Dijon this Sunday and Cluny, as mentioned above, on Wednesday.

Mary’s Meals is a charity dedicated to providing life changing meals to some of the world’s poorest children. Their vision is that every child receives one daily meal in their place of education and that all those who have more than they need, share with those who lack even the most basic things. We would really appreciate your support in helping raise funds for this charity. You can read more about their great work and perhaps donate to our project via the link below.

https://giving.marysmeals.org/en_gb/projects/cin1-clitheroe-to-lourdes—virtually

Alternatively you may like to ring Arnold Marsden on 01200 427096 or email cycle21lourdes@yahoo.com to be added to our sponsor list and receive weekly updates on our progress if you desire.

Please enjoy the journey with us and follow our progress, both real and virtual, via our travel blog www.mytb.org/BernieW

CLITHEROE CHURCHES IN PARTNERSHIP – CCP

HAMPER PROJECT

Thanks to the generosity of individuals and churches I am delighted to be able to tell you that the whole project is now fully funded.

The second phase of the project has now been completed. This was the largest phase – a total of sixteen hampers have been sent to the schools in our community.

We have received some lovely responses:

“Such a lovely gesture, thank you to all for thinking of us, the hamper is a huge hit with our staff. Whilst it is absolutely lovely to hear a noisy school once more, it is also a little daunting, so the prayers are very much appreciated too.”

“A huge thank you to all the local churches for the wonderful hampers! They were very much appreciated and utterly devoured”

We are now at the final phase of the project, which is dedicated to our community services and nominated key workers. We’ll be preparing hampers for the Post Office, the recycling centre, council workers, school crossing patrol officers, plus an additional hamper to bless the staff at The Grand. Alongside this, we will be making up individual hampers to give to key workers nominated by you!

We invite you to nominate up to ten key workers to receive these hampers. If you would like to nominate more than ten key workers, please get in touch with Chris Meyer at chrischrismeyer@gmail.com . Please send Chris your list of nominated key workers by the 17th March. Please also include the names of your nominated key workers in your email so we can personalise the hampers.

We aim to deliver the personalised hampers to you week commencing 22nd March. When you send your nominated list, we will arrange a convenient time to deliver them to your church.

Thank you all once again. If you have any questions please contact Chris at the above address.

Please feel free to bring the above information to the attention of your congregations as you see fit.

Blessings,

Alan Meyer


Improving communication in the Parish

Not everybody is comfortable with the digital world that we have had to rely on in the Parish for so long now.  Lots of information about the Parish including a much enlarged Parish newsletter is on the Parish website and for topical items of interest to Catholics there is Facebook.  But what about the people who don’t access websites,  aren’t familiar with zoom  or haven’t felt safe attending Mass during lockdown?

Some of these problems will disappear when normality returns but we would like to improve communication generally.  Communication is more than information, it’s community building, reaching out, keeping each other informed, looking after each other.

If you are interested in contributing to ideas and action on how to use communication to build a better community please join our next Communications and Media zoom meeting on 30 March at 7.00 pm.  We want your ideas more than commitment to action but practical assistance would of course be most welcome too.

Email Janet Clegg by telephone 01200 423307 or email janet.clegg@dioceseofsalford.org.uk so we can give you the link to join the meeting.

Anthony Brown


Let us Dream of a different world – Celia Capstick

In his recent book Let us Dream, Pope Francis set out a roadmap: ‘a path to a better future’. In conversation with Austen Ivereigh, he muses on how the Coronavirus pandemic can lead to transformation. It affects most of the world and is the most visible sign of the many crises we face today: climate change, wars, refugees fleeing poverty and hunger, and destruction of the natural world. The Bible talks of such trials as passing through fire. We are all tested in life and, “it is how we grow.” From his own life the pope describes how three crises changed him dramatically, and after the pandemic we must all emerge better. As Christians we must put others first, and any blueprint for change, he says, must “serve the poor and marginalised, just as Jesus did.” In the section entitled A Time to Choose the pope says that a sign of hope in this crisis is the leading role of women. Women have been some of the hardest hit by the pandemic – as health care workers or domestic workers on low pay – but women are also some of the most resilient. He notes women prime ministers globally who have reacted with empathy. He refers to the strength of women in the Gospel who followed Jesus to his death and were the first witnesses to the Resurrection. He wonders: ‘Could it be that in this crisis, the perspective that women bring is what the world needs at this time to meet the coming challenges?’ The pope rejects the old economic model of maximisation of profits, using the measurement of GDP (Gross Domestic Product). He feels this model plunders our planet, creates huge disparities of wealth and is ultimately unsustainable. Women economists, he suggests, like Kate Raworth, who offers an alternative model called ‘Doughnut Economics’, start from a basis of protecting people and the natural world through a way of life which is regenerative and distributive. At its heart is a concern that all humanity has access to land, lodging and labour, themes of Catholic social teaching. Pope Francis has appointed Kate and two other UK women economists to the Vatican Secretariat for the Economy. March 5th is Women’s World day of Prayer; March 8th is International Women’s day. Let us pray that the world will listen to such women and to Pope Francis, so that we emerge from the pandemic to a new sustainable and compassionate way of living.

Celia Capstick is on the National Board of Catholic Women’s Social Responsibility Committee.

Printed with permission of the Catholic Universe


FROM THE ARCHIVES:

THE HALL, LOWERGATE

CLITHEROE

THURSDAY EVENINGS

Feb 25th & Mar 3rd 1932

THE MEMBERS OF THE

CATHOLIC AMATEUR DRAMATIC SOCIETY

Will produce a Drama of Christ’s Passion, entitled:

“THE UPPER ROOM”

(by ROBERT HUGH BENSON)

THE PERSONS OF THE DRAMA:

THE DOCTOR

ACHAZ (the landlord of the Upper Room)

SAMUEL (his servant

JOSEPH OF ARIMATHEA

PETER

JOHN

JUDAS

LONGINUS

MARY

MARY MAGDALENE

VERONICA

The following Members will take part:

MESSRS C.WHITE, H.SUTCLIFFE, E.SWARBRICK, J.BALSHAW,

JAS. H, WINCKLEY, H.THORNBER, T.CAWLEY, W.MANLEY,

MISSES C.WHARTON, W.DEWHURST, R.CRABTREE.


Chorus of Male Voices under the direction of

Mr. Ed. Jackson, L.R.A.M.

Produced by MR.T.CAWLEY

Stage Managers: MESSRS. W.TAYLOR, F. PARKER, W. HOLDEN

Secretary: MR JOSEPH RENSHAW

Doors open 7.30p.m.                                        Commence 8pm prompt

Admission by Collection at the door


CLITHEROE CATHOLIC DRAMATIC SOCIETY

“ THE UPPER ROOM “

By Monsignor R.H.Benson

Crowded Audiences Show their Appriciation

The Hall, Lowergate, has a reputation for presenting good plays of all types, but we need have no qualms in asserting that none has been staged comparable with the sacred drama, “ The Upper Room.” Crowded audiences flocked to the Hall during Lent to witness what must surely be a unique production in the history of Clitheroe.

A Widespread Appeal.

It is indeed remarkable that the play made such a widespread appeal.  Men and women – young and old – were drawn to it equally, and their demeanour and comments testified to their appreciation:  we may say that it has been largely personal recommendation that many people came to the the drama, and this would assuredly have not ben forthcoming if the production did not merit it.

A Lasting Impression

One may naturally ask the cause of this immediate and distince appeal, and briefly we may reply that not only has the author chosen a subject which touches the heart of every Christian, but we had the good fortune of having an able band of actors to stage it as reverently and realistically as is humanly possible.  The company, in truth rose to heights of historic skill that amazed the people of Clitheroe.

The Last Supper and Calvary

The theme is one that touches the heart of every Christian, for the Passion and Death of Christ form the basis of the Divine scheme of redemption.  The Last Supper in the Upper Room, followed by the dramatic death on calvary, gave a life to the Church which will persist to the end of time.  He had promised to be present, to abide with us.  He is present, He abides.

A Lesson and its Teachers

We think it more appropriate in a drama of this kind to dwell rather on the theme than the actors, to consider the lessons rather than the teachers.  That they all of them gave of their best with sonsummate skill is a truth acknowledged by all who witnessed their presentation of the drama; and it would be an invidious task and uncharitable to those with lesser parts to institute comparisons or praise one more than another.  Without doubt it was difficult during the rendering to be conscious of them as our contemporaries, so ably did they portray and delineate the characters alotted to them.

A High Ideal

“Remisiscent of the Passion Play at Oberammergau,” was the verdict of one critic.  Now the “Upper Room” is a modest production in comparison with the Passion Play, but the players in both were inspired with the same faith, actuated by the same ideals and motives, to present in a true and humble way, for our edification and their own, the story of Christ’s Passion.  Clitheroe may feel proud of their achivement.


HOLY WEEK 2021

Palm Sunday Mass             12 noon Saturday (Dunsop Bridge)

5.30pm Saturday (Clitheroe)

9.30am Sunday (Clitheroe)

11am Sunday (Sabden)

 

Monday                Mass 10am (Clitheroe)

Tuesday                 Mass 10am (Clitheroe)

Wednesday           Mass 10am (Clitheroe)

EASTER TRIDUUM

HOLY THURSDAY

Mass of the Lord’s Supper 7pm (Clitheroe)

GOOD FRIDAY

The Passion of the Lord 3pm (Clitheroe)

(Stations of the Cross 11am in Sabden)

(Stations of the Cross at 11am in Dunsop Bridge)

HOLY SATURDAY

Easter Vigil 5pm (Clitheroe)

EASTER SUNDAY MASS

9am (Dunsop Bridge)

9.30am (Clitheroe)

11am (Sabden)

Posted in Clitheroe, Dunsop Bridge, Sabden, Weekly View.